Tuesday, June 15

Genetically Modified Foods

GMOs 101: FDA launches GMO consumer education initiative
Genetically Modified Foods

GMOs 101: FDA launches GMO consumer education initiative

The FDA, USDA and EPA have launched ‘Feed Your Mind’, a new Agricultural Biotechnology Education and Outreach Initiative that aims to increase consumer awareness and understanding of genetically engineered foods (GMOs). The GMO science-based consumer education initiative between the FDA, USDA, and EPA was funded by Congress in 2017. "Feed Your Mind is our new education initiative to help consumers better understand genetically engineered foods, commonly called GMOs or genetically modified organisms," stated the FDA on the new Feed Your Mind website. “Despite there being a wide range of foods — GMO and non-GMO — available to consumers, there is some confusion around what GMOs are and how they are used in our food supply.” Read more here...
Genetically Modified Food Market Next Big Thing
Genetically Modified Foods

Genetically Modified Food Market Next Big Thing

The Genetically Modified Food Market has witnessed continuous growth in the last few years and is projected to grow even further during the forecast period of 2020-2026. The exploration provides a 360° view and insights, highlighting major outcomes of the industry. These insights help the business decision-makers to formulate better business plans and make informed decisions to improved profitability. In addition, the study helps venture or private players in understanding the companies in more detail to make better informed decisions. Some of the major and emerging players in the Global Genetically Modified Food market are Syngenta, Monsanto, KWS SAAT, Bayer Crop Science, BASF, DowDuPont & Limagrain. Read more by clicking here...
Genetically Modified Foods: Friend or Foe?
Genetically Modified Foods

Genetically Modified Foods: Friend or Foe?

The EU has not approved any genetically modified (GM) fruit or vegetables as safe for human consumption and in the UK they are mainly used to feed animals. In contrast, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are present in up to 70% of foods on the U.S. supermarket shelves. So is the EU being pedantic in choosing an organic approach? GMOs are organisms that have their DNA altered to include genetic material from another organism. This is done by isolating the gene that codes for the desired protein (such as one that codes for pesticide resistance) then inserting it into the crop or livestock’s germline. New gene-editing technology such as CRISPR has the potential to make genetic alterations even easier. Read more at Cherwell.
GMOs Are an Ally in a Changing Climate
Genetically Modified Foods

GMOs Are an Ally in a Changing Climate

Someone once told me you could survive on just peanut butter sandwiches and oranges. I have no idea if that's true, but the advice suggested a tasty lunch for a road trip. It was a freezing, foggy day last December, and I was preparing to drive from my home in Klamath Falls, Oregon, to California's Central Valley, the great agricultural heartland of a state that produces a third of the country's vegetables and two-thirds of its fruits and nuts. As I spread my peanut butter, I read the packages on my counter. My nine-grain bread promised, vaguely, that it was “made with natural ingredients.” My oranges were “locally grown.” Read the full story at Wired
GMOs: What they are, are they safe and which foods have them
Genetically Modified Foods

GMOs: What they are, are they safe and which foods have them

Glow-in-the-dark mice, silk-producing goats, venomous cabbage -- these are all wacky and downright unsettling examples of what can happen when scientists tinker with DNA. They're also part of the reason that the public and scientific debates about genetically modified organisms -- known as GMOs -- persist. Luckily, "Frankenfoods" like the venomous cabbage, aren't something you'll likely ever come into contact with. The GMOs that might be on your plate or in your snacks have been evaluated and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and they're perfectly safe, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). What are GMOs? GMO foods have been genetically engineered to alter the DNA of the food source for some specific purpose -- a good example is the famed Flavr Savr t...
Why we need mandatory labeling of GMO products
Genetically Modified Foods

Why we need mandatory labeling of GMO products

The conversation around genetic engineering and food is undermined by a lack of information that breeds confusion and distrust. Consumers feel misled. Scientists feel misunderstood. Public officials make flailing attempts to navigate the interests of both. Meanwhile, the companies that choose to play both sides take advantage of everyone — quietly adding genetically modified organisms (GMO) or ingredients made from them to some products and non-GMO labels to others. Afraid of GMOs? Blame non-labeling Genetically modified organisms are commonplace and are already present in many of the foods we eat — often, though not exclusively, in the form of genetically modified corn, soy, sugar beet, and canola oil. But as ubiquitous as they are, they’re shrouded in mystery. Across most of the Un...
Tips to be fit: Genetically modified foods: Are they safe?
Genetically Modified Foods

Tips to be fit: Genetically modified foods: Are they safe?

When is corn not corn? When is a chicken not a chicken? What is a better egg? The answer is when it’s been genetically modified. We have been trying to produce better food forever. Farms modified food when they saved seeds of cream-of-the-crop plants to grow the next season. That's when we turned small bunches of tiny kernels on tall grass years ago into the big ears of corn on the cob we have today. We picked the best animals of the litter to breed "new-and-improved" animals. We grafted the branch of one orange tree to another orange tree to get a different tasting orange. What we do now is we alter the genetic code of the plant or animal. This alteration can be genetic coding is taken out or added to produce a product that is more desirable. For a few decades, food manufacturers began...
Fruits and Vegetable Seeds Market Growing
Genetically Modified Foods

Fruits and Vegetable Seeds Market Growing

• Growing health consciousness among consumers also generates massive demand for nutritious food items. • Other factors supporting market growth include an increase in seed replacement rate and surging adoption of genetically modified (GM) crops. • The market growth might be hindered by fluctuating climatic conditions and regulations governing the cultivation of GM crops. Surging demand for healthy food items along with the adoption of modern agricultural practices are key factors driving the growth of the fruits and vegetables seeds market. Other factors supporting the growth of the market include an increase in seed replacement rate and surging adoption of genetically modified crops. Surging demand for healthy food items along with the adoption of modern agricultural practices a...
What are GMOs in Australia?
Genetically Modified Foods

What are GMOs in Australia?

What is GMO food? ‘GMO food’ is food that’s been unnaturally genetically modified to express certain traits that make them more beneficial to us as a species. You might think this sounds scary, but GMO foods are much more common and much safer than you might think. GMO meaning: What is genetically modified food? Genetically modified organisms⁠—known largely as GMOs—are simply living things that undergo the process of genetic engineering. Oftentimes, when people think about GMOs, they think about plants and crops, but that’s not all it’s limited to. GMOs can extend to small organisms such as bacteria or fungi, or even animals such as goats and pigs. Most GMOs these days are indeed food, and a lot of them have been appearing on your supermarket shelves for decades. The first genetic...
Could GMO Crops Help Solve The Climate Crisis?
Genetically Modified Foods

Could GMO Crops Help Solve The Climate Crisis?

Genetically engineered cereals may hold the key to sustainable agriculture Genetic engineering may be anathema to many card-carrying environmentalists, who typically favor organic farming over other forms of agriculture. But to overcome the threat posed by climate change -- while continuing to feed 7.7 billion mouths (and counting) -- many scientists say it’s time to fully embrace the three most controversial letters in the food industry: GMO. Their goal is to radically shrink the carbon footprint of global crop cultivation by doing away with the need for synthetic fertilizers, which account for about 5% of humanity’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Through extensive DNA manipulations, scientists are optimistic they can engineer a self-fertilizing relationship between crop species ...