Letter: The Real Reason To Be Worried About cs

We live in an age where access to knowledge on virtually any topic is at our fingertips. Yet, we are bombarded by misinformation on a daily basis. Modern advancements in scientific research are often sensationalized or disputed, with findings rarely reported to the public with the appropriate contexts and caveats.

The term “GMO food” usually refers to an organism that has been modified in a laboratory setting or has had a direct transfer of genes into its DNA. Unfortunately, these foods are misunderstood. Due to the complexity of genetic research and the speed at which advancements are being made, there is an alarming lack of accessible, comprehensible resources by which to evaluate this topic from a public perspective.

As a result, the general public is directed toward sources masquerading as reliable outlets of scientific research. Media outlets, blog posts or opinion articles are written by seemingly trustworthy individuals often present the results of scientific literature in a way that is easily understood by those without formal education in the sciences but are usually riddled with errors or misinterpretations of scientific findings.

The process of genetically modifying an organism isn’t scary if you understand the science, but that doesn’t mean you should become complacent. You should be worried about GMOs, but for reasons, you may not have considered.

The copyright policies and corporate monopolies surrounding GMO production are worth worrying about. Corporations such as Monsanto have been repeatedly accused of biased research and fraudulent claims surrounding their products. For example, Monsanto has recently been accused of secretly influencing studies conducted by Health Canada — studies that were instrumental in the Government of Canada’s decision to approve the sale of Monsanto’s “safe” weed-killer, Roundup. Recent evidence shows that traces of the active ingredient in Roundup, glyphosate, are found in many food products. If Monsanto secretly guided studies claiming the safety of glyphosate, there is a justifiable cause for concern and an immediate need to re-evaluate these studies.

Full story at Western Gazette

Infants Health At Risk With Genetically Modified Food

Infant foods, Similac Alimentum and Similac Isomil, which are widely used for children with lactose intolerance, have been found to contain genetically modified foods, according to a study carried out by the Centre for Science and Environment.

Twenty-five per cent of the samples imported from Netherlands and the US were found to be positive. There was no label to indicate they were GM positive.

The study found imported foods like Kellogg’s Froot Loops, American Garden popcorn, Trix Corn Puffs, Mori-Nu-Tofu, Bugles, Karo and Aunt Jemima corn-based syrups were GM positive, as was PromPlus sweet whole kernel corn from Thailand.

Mr Amit Khurana from the food safety team at CSE said, “The risk assessment of GM positive foods has shown that there is toxicity, allergic reaction and change in composition of major and minor nutrients. More work is required to understand its specific impact on human health.”

Deccan Chronicle

Infants Health At Risk With Genetically Modified Food

Infant foods, Similac Alimentum and Similac Isomil, which are widely used for children with lactose intolerance, have been found to contain genetically modified foods, according to a study carried out by the Centre for Science and Environment.

Twenty-five per cent of the samples imported from Netherlands and the US were found to be positive. There was no label to indicate they were GM positive.

Nutritionist Sujatha Stephen of Yashoda Hospitals said, “Infants who are exposed to genetically modified foods are at risk of childhood obesity and early metabolic problems. Children’s immunity is compromised when they are not breast-fed and putting them on substitutes adds to the risk.

The study found imported foods like Kellogg’s Froot Loops, American Garden popcorn, Trix Corn Puffs, Mori-Nu-Tofu, Bugles, Karo and Aunt Jemima corn-based syrups were GM positive, as was PromPlus sweet whole kernel corn from Thailand.

Deccan Chronicle