Getting A Break From Your Diet May Help You Lose Weight

For most people, dieting isn’t a particularly enjoyable experience. Usually, because diets involve ignoring the advice of nutritionists who suggest ‘everything in moderation’ is the key to weight loss, and instead encourage you to cut out entire food groups (mainly the ones you love).

But if you’re someone who’s ever endured the torture of a diet, you’ll be over the moon at this latest scientific discovery: scrapping your diet for a couple of weeks could actually help you lose weight.

How could ditching your diet lead to more weight loss? But according to the recent study published in the International Journal for Obesity, that’s exactly what they found.

The study took a group of clinically obese participants and split them into two groups. Both groups were instructed to follow a 16-week diet which saw their usual calorie intake reduced by a third, however, the groups differed in how they carried out this diet.

Read more at Cosmopolitan

STUDY FINDS: Weight Loss May Come Down To What’s In Your Poop

Wondering why a diet’s not working for you? Stop watching your waistline and consider something a little deeper — like the feces lodged in your intestines.

A study this month in the International Journal of Obesity found that a specific diet’s success may come down to the bacteria mix in one’s gut, as observed in stool samples.

The study shows that only about half of the population will lose weight if they eat in accordance with the Danish national dietary recommendations and eat more fruit, vegetables, fibers and whole grains,” said Mads F. Hjorth, a co-author of the study and nutrition professor at the University of Copenhagen.

Read more at USA Today

The Alkaline Diet: Does it Really Work for Weight Loss?

Alkaline Diet, Alkaline Ash Diet, Alkaline Acid Diet and Acid Ash Diet are the various names of diets that come under the umbrella of alkaline diets. The premise these diets are based on is that certain foods can affect the acidity or pH of the body, helping prevent the onset of diseases and even treat them.

Healthy Ways to Love Your Body that added to the hype and interest for this style of eating. Adding to its health benefits of protection against cancer and arthritis, what shot it to fame was the universal pitch that never fails -weight loss!

According to the proponents of this diet, acidity causing foods lead to an increased risk of diseases and an alkaline diet cleanses and protects your body. An alkaline diet allows you to eat:

• Raw Foods
• Plant Proteins
• Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
• Alkaline water
• Green Drinks
• Foods that cause an acidic environment that must be avoided:
• Eggs
• Lentils
• High Sodium foods

Read more at Smart Cooky

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet has been a hot topic of late. Depending on who you talk to, it is praised for its incredible weight loss results, criticized for being too restrictive, or condemned as dangerous, especially without medical supervision.

What is a ketogenic diet?

A ketogenic eating pattern is very low in carbohydrates and moderates in protein, meaning a high percentage of total energy intake comes from fat found in dairy products and meat.

“A true ketogenic is one where carbohydrate intake is extremely low — usually less than 10 percent of your total energy intake,” Collins told HuffPost Australia.

How does a ketogenic diet work?

During times of severe energy restriction (such as during fasting or starvation), prolonged intense exercise, or when carbohydrate intake is reduced to around 50 grams per day or less, the body can enter ketosis.

This means that, rather than the body burning its primary fuel source, glycogen (a “complex carbohydrate, which in the human body is like petrol for a car”), the body must break down fats as its main source of fuel.

Read the full article at Huffingtonpost.com

Is Your Diet Making Your Liver Sick?

Many diets have been hailed as being able to improve your health, such as the Mediterranean diet. The typical Western diet is high in fat and sugar, and we already know these two components can wreak havoc on our health. The latest findings suggest that the Western diet can have detrimental effects on our liver as well.

Western diet increases risk of liver cancer

A new study was done where researchers fed mice a Western diet, which is high in fat and sugar. These mice were more likely to develop liver tumors compared to mice who did not consume the Western diet. When the Western diet-fed mice were treated with antibiotics, they did not respond to the treatment.

The researchers specifically looked at mice missing farnesoid x receptor (FXR), which is involved in bile synthesis, secretion, and transport. Bile is necessary for proper digestion. Low FXR levels are seen in patients with cirrhosis or liver cancer.

Lead author of the study Dr. Yu-Jui Yvonne Wan explained, “Gut and liver health are linked. Because the liver receives 70 percent of its blood supply from the intestine, it is important to understand how the gut contributes to liver disease development.”

There are many studies that attribute a Western diet to poor health and this is just another one that solidifies the point. Instead, we should opt for a diet low in fat and sugar. As mentioned earlier, the Mediterranean diet time and time again is hailed for its numerous benefits to health. It emphasizes a high intake of fruits and vegetables, lean meats, and above all, low fat and sugar.

Bel Marra Health

Watching your Weight: 8 Ways to Keep Your Diet On Track

Being able to adhere to our diet is what will guarantee whether we see the weight loss results we want, and there are ways and means for us to improve the likelihood of successfully accomplishing that.

To save you time, and to eliminate the guesswork, here are my top eight tips for improving your diet adherence…

1. Make small changes

It’s easy to begin feeling overwhelmed by the amount of “new” things we have to direct our energy towards when making changes in our diet, and all too often will give up when we realize we can’t sustain it.

2. Build a support network

Surrounding yourself with others who support our goals and encourage positive behaviors can have a huge impact on motivating us to stay consistent with our efforts.

Spending more time with those who encourage our efforts, socializing with other gym members, or joining online fitness/coaching and communities can all be great ways of building up that positive support network.

Read more at Belfast Telegraph

Weight loss diet: Doing THIS Before Bed Could help you Lose the Love Handles

Casein is the main protein present in milk and milk products and is available to buy in powder form, similar to whey protein.

While many fitness fanatics take casein like protein powder to enhance their performance and to look leaner, researchers have found that incorporating it into a weight loss plan and taking it before you go to bed can help burn fat.

A study conducted in the Netherlands found that by multiplying casein intake by two and a half times, participants were able to have a higher metabolic rate while sleeping and a better overall fat balance.

The research, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, also found that after taking casein before sleep, satiety levels were 25 per cent higher across the following day.

Weight loss teas are a popular shortcut to flatter stomachs, and the latest version can help with weight loss goals – according to experts.

Read more at Express

Coffee diet: Can you slurp your way to slim?

What’s better than the aroma of fresh coffee brewing in the morning? How about the notion that the deep dark elixir of the dawn may actually be the key to losing weight. Oh yeah.

“Caffeine can boost athletic performance, both in terms of measurable exercise outcomes such as speed, power, and endurance, as well as psychological benefits in terms of making exercise seem more achievable,” said nutritionist Kristen Beck. “Coffee can suppress appetite simply by providing a boost of energy, but (the trouble with) relying on coffee as a source of energy is that it is only short-term.”

Other health experts note that coffee has also been associated with reducing the risks of conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease, not to mention type 2 diabetes. It may even blunt the danger of several kinds of cancer.

Continue Reading at The Mercury News

Meal Prepping May Actually Be Sabotaging Your Diet

Indeed, meal prepping’s popularity has exploded on social media. On Instagram alone there are 5.5 million photos tagged #mealprep and 1.1 million tagged #foodprep.

While perfectly portioned-out food for seven days does make for the perfect #foodporn snapshot, meal preppers are onto an idea that — at least in concept — is good for your diet, according to research.

More recently, a 2017 study of 40,000 adults in France found that people who meal prepped at least a few days at a time were less likely to be overweight and stuck more closely to nutritional guidelines.

Portion control is one key way food prepping helps people maintain a healthy weight or lose a few pounds.

A review of several studies around the role of portion control in weight management showed that eating the appropriate amount of food is directly linked.

Continue Reading at HealthLine

Successful Weight Loss Dieting? Check Blood Sugar and Insulin First!

Success on a weight-loss diet can be predicted by measuring a person’s blood sugar and fasting insulin levels, according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association meeting in San Diego.

The international study examined data from six studies of different diets designed to improve nutrition. It found that those biomarkers consistently predicted losing weight and keeping it off.

A fiber-rich diet without calorie restrictions is successful for many with prediabetes, the study found. Carbohydrate and fat intake should be adjusted according to fasting insulin levels.

“Remarkably, for many patients, use of these biomarkers can lead to a six- to seven-fold greater weight loss,” said study leader Arne Astrup. He is head of the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

The study also included researchers from the University of Colorado, Tufts University, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBER OBN) and Gelesis, Inc.

And for the diets to really stick, they can’t be temporary, but part of a changed lifestyle that people can embrace without feeling deprived.

The San Diego Union Tribe