The Keto Meal Plan for Beginners

So you’ve decided you want to try out the high-fat, low-carb diet, better-known as the fat-burning ketogenic diet. Whether it’s to lose weight, have more energy, or fuel workouts differently, going keto is a popular choice right now. But figuring out a keto meal plan on your own is no easy feat, especially since eating a diet super high in fats doesn’t come naturally to many people who are accustomed to the traditionally carb-heavy American diet.

What’s more, it’s especially important to make sure your diet is well-planned when you’re eating keto-style, because the foods you can choose from are limited. In addition to checking in with a dietitian if you’re able, Stefanski recommends that you “talk to your doctor and make sure she or he is aware that you’ll be starting a diet that completely changes how your body metabolizes energy.”

One area where food tracking can be especially helpful, though, is ensuring that you’re hitting the right ratios of macronutrients—protein, carbs, and fat. “The most researched version of the ketogenic diet derives 70 percent of calories from healthy fats, 20 percent from protein, and only 10 percent from carbs,” explains Charles Passler, D.C., nutritionist, and founder of Pure Change.

Lastly, if you’re active, you might need to make some adjustments to take that into account. “For the first one to two weeks, temporarily reducing your exercise load can be helpful as your body adjusts to being in ketosis,” he says. “Additionally, for those who have an intense workout schedule, carb cycling may be a good option.” Carb cycling essentially means you’ll increase your carb intake on the days you’re doing exercise, ideally just two to three days per week.

Full article in Shape

Improving Your Diet Can Also Improve Your Skin

Revamping our eating habits can make for a healthier body. Did you know that making a few key changes to your diet could help to improve the look and feel of your skin, too?

Here are some ways that adjusting your eating habits can help you achieve a brighter, more even, and healthier-looking complexion:

▪ Sugar contributes to signs of aging.

Consuming too much sugar isn’t just bad for our waistlines; it can also contribute to signs of aging on our skin, including lines, wrinkles, and age spots. That’s because sugar triggers a chemical process called glycation within your body.

▪ Vitamin A boosts collagen.

Vitamin A is found in many different foods, including carrots, sweet potatoes, and kale. This vitamin is a type of retinoid, which encourages collagen production within your skin and turns “good” anti-aging genes on while turning “bad” anti-aging genes off.

▪ Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant.

Antioxidants are some of the most beneficial skin care ingredients that you can both apply topically and ingest through food sources and supplements to fight free radicals and achieve a brighter, healthier-looking complexion.

Read more at Miami Herald

NO YOLK! Boiled Egg Diet: Does it Work?

Entering a new year is a good time to correct some dietary deficiencies. So this article revisits a topic I covered eight years ago. When it comes to injuries such as muscle strains, ligament tears, nerve irritation, tendon tears, tendonitis, etc., most people would think about taking Advil, getting a cortisone shot, receiving physical therapy, chiropractic treatment or even surgery.

In particular, there are three main dietary components that can have a positive influence on the recovery and prevention of injury. These three components are simple yet elusive: calcium/magnesium and zinc; hydration; and an anti-inflammatory diet.

Calcium and magnesium are essential minerals for all of our bodily systems. Calcium is required for all muscle contractions and nerve functions. Without calcium, it is difficult for our systems to function at their best, whether you are competing in a marathon or healing from an injury or surgery.

9 to 18 years: 1,300 mg

19 to 50 years: 1,000 mg

50-plus years: 1,200 mg

Remember that these doses are for the general public. Athletes in training or a patient recovering from an injury who gets the “minimal” dose through their diet will still need to take a calcium supplement to make up for the calcium that is used for aggressive exercise, rehabilitation and/or recovery.

More of this news at Auburnpub.com

A Diet High In Fat Is Best – With The Right Kind Of Fat

This is the time of year we tend to consider a change in diet. There has been a lot of confusion in recent years about what constitutes a healthy diet, with many people advocating and espousing a ketogenic diet, similar to the Atkins diet: a low-carbohydrate, high-fat/high-cholesterol diet (HF/HC). Since most North Americans will die of a heart attack or stroke if they don’t die young from another cause, this is a big mistake.

In 2016, there were large headlines trumpeting that “we can eat cholesterol now; the new U.S. guideline says so.” But that’s not what the guideline said. It said that there were insufficient data on which to base a specific limit to daily cholesterol intake, as in the past, but the intake of cholesterol should be as low as possible within the recommended eating pattern.

A study that clarifies what is the best diet for weight loss and diabetes was done among overweight residents of a nuclear facility in Israel, who were randomized to a low-fat versus a low-carb HF/HC (Atkins) diet, versus the Mediterranean diet. Weight loss was identical on the Mediterranean diet and the low-carb HF/HC diet, and both were better than the low-fat diet. The key finding, though, was that the Mediterranean diet was clearly the best for lowering blood sugar, fasting insulin levels and something called insulin resistance (a pre-diabetic state).

So the healthiest diet is the Mediterranean diet – a high-fat/low-glycemic index diet. This is why recent guidelines – the 2016 U.S. guideline, and the Canadian guideline now in development – are moving toward a more plant-based pattern of eating. We should limit red meat, avoid egg yolks and have three vegetarian days a week.

Read the full article at The Globe and Mail

Is GMO Opposition Immoral?

Evaluation of GMO crops that emphasizes independent science — rather than nonpublic research by pesticide companies — reflects that in 2015, the research arm of the World Health Organization analyzed all published glyphosate studies and determined the pesticide was a probable carcinogen. That finding prompted California to add glyphosate to its list of cancer-causing chemicals.

Escalating use of GMO crops and glyphosate has triggered the growth of glyphosate-resistant superweeds across nearly 100 million acres in 36 states. To combat that, pesticide companies are now pushing the use of the highly toxic, drift-prone pesticide dicamba on a new generation of GMO crops that tolerate both dicamba and glyphosate.

I have long been perplexed that so many people continue to condemn foods made from genetically modified organisms that have been consumed by Americans and others for decades with no deleterious effects.

Mitch Daniels rightly framed as “immoral” the scientifically baseless yet “concerted, deep-pockets campaign” to persuade “a high percentage of Americans and Europeans to avoid GMO products” and “inflict their superstitions” on the world’s poor and hungry.

Apparently, winning market share and lawsuits is more important to some people than feeding a hungry planet.

Read the full article in The Washington Post

Water Diet: The ‘Most Dangerous Weight Loss Regime Ever’

AS desperate dieters go to ­extreme lengths to shed the Christmas kilos and slim down for summer, experts have taken aim at a deadly new diet that bans everything but water, tea, and coffee.

With the so-called #waterfast diet becoming a potentially fatal fad via social media, body image and eating disorder advocate Mia Findlay warned “starving” your body was the “most dangerous” way to lose weight.

“There are a lot of people who do reviews on these so-called diets, and they say they felt so clear-headed, and they felt like they were reaching this state of nirvana, and the reason that is happening is that their bodies are going into starvation mode,” Ms. Findlay said.

Meanwhile, eating disorder expert Joanne Labiner said “water fasting” pushed the body to an anorexia-like state, risking organ damage and death.

“It can be so bad for your organs, that’s why people with anorexia can die of a heart attack — their body feeds on their heart,” she said. “Our body thinks it’s an emergency and tries to prevent that fat storage from being used up and it feeds on the muscle.”

Read the full article in Daily Telegraph

Want More Brain Energy? Try this Diet!

What doesn’t kill brain cells might make them stronger. The brain cells of mice who regularly fast may grow more than usual once they get food again, according to research presented at the Society for Neuroscience’s annual meeting in November and first reported by New Scientist.

One particular protein may be behind the growth: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In humans, BDNF may be involved in learning and memory. Levels of this protein tend to decline as a person gets older, especially if someone is diagnosed with a disease that can affect cognitive functions like Alzheimer’s. However, levels of this protein increase in mice that have been fasting by up to 50 percent.

In theory, Mattson said, BDNF might be stimulating cells to produce more mitochondria. Mitochondria are often described as the powerhouse of the cell—they’re what are responsible for transforming chemicals into an energy form that a cell can use to function. Having more of these mitochondria may allow brain cells to make more connections to other brain cells, too.

However, that’s still speculation. For now, so is the idea that fasting might make your brain work better. What Mattson can say, though, is that it might—“if you’re a mouse or a rat.”

News Week

People Are Losing Their Minds Over The CICO Diet

Another day, another diet (or another diet headline at least) and this new diet, named CICO for “Calories In, Calories Out” is particularly appealing because you can eat whatever you like and still lose weight.

Sprouted on the Reddit website, it is claimed that the CICO diet works wonders as it allows dieters to eat whatever types of foods they like, in whatever form they want, as long as they consume fewer calories than they burn — the good old weight loss equation.

As such we are likely to see the CICO Diet in the pile of old, useless diets in a few short months.
So here are just some of the reasons it is unlikely you can eat masses of cake, fast food, and sugary processed snacks while dropping the kilos.

1. Weight loss is not a one size fits all model

While we often talk about weight loss as a universal concept, the reality is that every single person has a unique set of genes, lifestyle, and behaviors that ultimately means the specific variables required for fat metabolism and sustainable weight loss will be different for every single person.

2. It is easy to go overboard with calories

The CICO Diet sounds appealing — eat cake and lose weight but it is important to remember it is difficult to keep daily calorie intake controlled when high calorie, processed foods including fast and fried foods, cakes, biscuits, chocolates, and pastries are being consumed.

Read more at News.com

Is Insulin Resistance Linked to Diet Quality?

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition examined the role of diet quality in increasing rates of insulin resistance in a Chinese population.

As you consume a meal, glucose (sugar) from the carbohydrates you ingest is released into the bloodstream. This triggers a response causing your body to produce the hormone insulin, enabling the glucose to be absorbed by the cells in your body to be used for energy. As the glucose enters your body’s cells, the concentration of glucose in your blood decreases. Insulin resistance is a condition in which cells cannot respond normally to insulin. This leads to high blood sugar, which eventually leads to type 2 diabetes.

Over the past 20 years, China has experienced rapid economic growth, concurrent with shifts in diet and physical activity. The diet of Chinese adults has shown declines in the intake of vegetables, legumes, and coarse grains alongside an increased intake of oils and animal-source foods.

A new study published in The Journal of Nutrition examined the association of changes in diet quality with biomarkers of diabetes.In this study, 4,734 adults were assessed between 1991 and 2006. The diet quality of these individuals was measured longitudinally by the tailored Alternative Healthy Eating Index (tAHEI) where high scores indicate high diet quality, and low scores indicate low diet quality.

Additionally, individuals who improved their diets over the course of the study also had lower values of diabetes biomarkers. Fasting blood glucose did show an association with any group studied.

Read the full article at Medical News Bulletin

Can High-Protein Diets Damage Your Kidneys?

Here’s a quote that’s been floating around the Internet: “When life gives you lemons, you ask for something higher in protein.”

While it’s not clear who originated the quote (probably not a pasta maker or a bread baker), the quote certainly highlights the recent popularity of high-protein diets such as the Dukan, the Atkins, the South Beach, the Paleo and the Ketogenic diets.

Also, eating too much protein is not without its risks. An article just published in the New England Journal of Medicine reviewed the scientific evidence on what the amount of protein in your diet can do to your kidneys.

For the article, Kamyar Kalantar‑Zadeh, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D. of the University of California-Irvine School of Medicine and Denis Fouque, M.D., Ph.D. from the Université Claude Bernard Lyon summarized what is known from studies in animals and humans. Think of your kidneys as the filtering system for your blood.

Moreover, keep in mind that, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 14% of people in the United States have chronic kidney disease, most commonly from high blood pressure or diabetes.

Read more at Forbes