Monday, August 10

Genetically Modified Foods

Have your cake and eat it too, so long as they’re GMO: 5 Reasons GMO should be on your shopping list
Genetically Modified Foods

Have your cake and eat it too, so long as they’re GMO: 5 Reasons GMO should be on your shopping list

Impossible Burger is a household name best recognized for its successful introduction of a plant-based burger that “bleeds” and has no animal hormones or antibiotics. But, there is another notable “first” for Impossible Burger—it is the first product in stores to adopt the new USDA-approved “bioengineered” GMO (genetically modified organism) product label that will soon be federally-mandated. This puts a spotlight on a major debate: the safety of GMO products.   While there have been no proven documented cases of GMOs causing harm in humans or animals, numerous studies show that consumers generally don’t understand or lack familiarity with GMOs and are decidedly wary to try products that are genetically engineered.  For example, the pro-GMO organization GMO Answers found that 70% of...
25 Years of GMOs
Genetically Modified Foods

25 Years of GMOs

It has been 25 years since GMO crops first came on the market. Since then, GMOs have not just transformed agriculture by providing a valuable tool for farmers, but they have also helped the environment, consumers, and communities around the world. GMOs are an important tool in the fight against climate change, thanks to no-till farming which allows for lower CO2 emissions and helps soil health and water quality. GMOs also preserve habitats by allowing farmers to grow more on less land. Over 25 years, GMOs have helped provide greater food security through increased yields and GMOs that help fight food waste. GMOs have also helped consumers through lower food prices, and farmers through increased return on investment, especially in low-income countries. GMOs are an important ...
Unfavourable attitudes toward genetically modified food predict negative feelings about other food technologies
Genetically Modified Foods

Unfavourable attitudes toward genetically modified food predict negative feelings about other food technologies

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH) have found that people who hold negative opinions of genetically-modified (GM) food are likely to feel the same about nano-enabled food—food with nano-additives to enhance flavour, nutrition or prolong shelf life. In a survey of 1,000 respondents led by NTU comprising adult Singaporeans and permanent residents, close to a third found GM food unappealing, and their negative feelings influenced how they viewed nano-enabled food. Over a third felt neutral about GM food, while the remaining respondents welcomed it. While the study focused specifically on reactions towards nano-enabled foods, lead investigator and NTU Associate Professor Shirley Ho said that ...
Genetically Modified Food Market to reach 130 million tons next year
Genetically Modified Foods

Genetically Modified Food Market to reach 130 million tons next year

Despite all of the criticism and hindrances, the GMO food market has started picking up in recent years due to the nutritional value it offers. However, the GMO food market is in its nascent stage and has a long way to go to reach every shelf in the market. As the demand for GMO food is on a continuous rise, stacked traits, a mix of more than one transgene, is expected to see the highest growth when compared to Herbicide Tolerance (HT) and Insect Resistance (IR). The research predicted that production of genetically modified crops will increase from 112 million tons in 2015 to 130 million tons in the year 2021. The report on the Genetically Modified Food market provides a bird’s eye view of the current proceeding within the Genetically Modified Food market. Continue reading...
GMOs 101: FDA launches GMO consumer education initiative
Genetically Modified Foods

GMOs 101: FDA launches GMO consumer education initiative

The FDA, USDA and EPA have launched ‘Feed Your Mind’, a new Agricultural Biotechnology Education and Outreach Initiative that aims to increase consumer awareness and understanding of genetically engineered foods (GMOs). The GMO science-based consumer education initiative between the FDA, USDA, and EPA was funded by Congress in 2017. "Feed Your Mind is our new education initiative to help consumers better understand genetically engineered foods, commonly called GMOs or genetically modified organisms," stated the FDA on the new Feed Your Mind website. “Despite there being a wide range of foods — GMO and non-GMO — available to consumers, there is some confusion around what GMOs are and how they are used in our food supply.” Read more here...
Genetically Modified Food Market Next Big Thing
Genetically Modified Foods

Genetically Modified Food Market Next Big Thing

The Genetically Modified Food Market has witnessed continuous growth in the last few years and is projected to grow even further during the forecast period of 2020-2026. The exploration provides a 360° view and insights, highlighting major outcomes of the industry. These insights help the business decision-makers to formulate better business plans and make informed decisions to improved profitability. In addition, the study helps venture or private players in understanding the companies in more detail to make better informed decisions. Some of the major and emerging players in the Global Genetically Modified Food market are Syngenta, Monsanto, KWS SAAT, Bayer Crop Science, BASF, DowDuPont & Limagrain. Read more by clicking here...
Genetically Modified Foods: Friend or Foe?
Genetically Modified Foods

Genetically Modified Foods: Friend or Foe?

The EU has not approved any genetically modified (GM) fruit or vegetables as safe for human consumption and in the UK they are mainly used to feed animals. In contrast, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are present in up to 70% of foods on the U.S. supermarket shelves. So is the EU being pedantic in choosing an organic approach? GMOs are organisms that have their DNA altered to include genetic material from another organism. This is done by isolating the gene that codes for the desired protein (such as one that codes for pesticide resistance) then inserting it into the crop or livestock’s germline. New gene-editing technology such as CRISPR has the potential to make genetic alterations even easier. Read more at Cherwell.
GMOs Are an Ally in a Changing Climate
Genetically Modified Foods

GMOs Are an Ally in a Changing Climate

Someone once told me you could survive on just peanut butter sandwiches and oranges. I have no idea if that's true, but the advice suggested a tasty lunch for a road trip. It was a freezing, foggy day last December, and I was preparing to drive from my home in Klamath Falls, Oregon, to California's Central Valley, the great agricultural heartland of a state that produces a third of the country's vegetables and two-thirds of its fruits and nuts. As I spread my peanut butter, I read the packages on my counter. My nine-grain bread promised, vaguely, that it was “made with natural ingredients.” My oranges were “locally grown.” Read the full story at Wired
GMOs: What they are, are they safe and which foods have them
Genetically Modified Foods

GMOs: What they are, are they safe and which foods have them

Glow-in-the-dark mice, silk-producing goats, venomous cabbage -- these are all wacky and downright unsettling examples of what can happen when scientists tinker with DNA. They're also part of the reason that the public and scientific debates about genetically modified organisms -- known as GMOs -- persist. Luckily, "Frankenfoods" like the venomous cabbage, aren't something you'll likely ever come into contact with. The GMOs that might be on your plate or in your snacks have been evaluated and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and they're perfectly safe, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). What are GMOs? GMO foods have been genetically engineered to alter the DNA of the food source for some specific purpose -- a good example is the famed Flavr Savr t...
Why we need mandatory labeling of GMO products
Genetically Modified Foods

Why we need mandatory labeling of GMO products

The conversation around genetic engineering and food is undermined by a lack of information that breeds confusion and distrust. Consumers feel misled. Scientists feel misunderstood. Public officials make flailing attempts to navigate the interests of both. Meanwhile, the companies that choose to play both sides take advantage of everyone — quietly adding genetically modified organisms (GMO) or ingredients made from them to some products and non-GMO labels to others. Afraid of GMOs? Blame non-labeling Genetically modified organisms are commonplace and are already present in many of the foods we eat — often, though not exclusively, in the form of genetically modified corn, soy, sugar beet, and canola oil. But as ubiquitous as they are, they’re shrouded in mystery. Across most of the Un...