Watching your Weight: 8 Ways to Keep Your Diet On Track

Being able to adhere to our diet is what will guarantee whether we see the weight loss results we want, and there are ways and means for us to improve the likelihood of successfully accomplishing that.

To save you time, and to eliminate the guesswork, here are my top eight tips for improving your diet adherence…

1. Make small changes

It’s easy to begin feeling overwhelmed by the amount of “new” things we have to direct our energy towards when making changes in our diet, and all too often will give up when we realize we can’t sustain it.

2. Build a support network

Surrounding yourself with others who support our goals and encourage positive behaviors can have a huge impact on motivating us to stay consistent with our efforts.

Spending more time with those who encourage our efforts, socializing with other gym members, or joining online fitness/coaching and communities can all be great ways of building up that positive support network.

Read more at Belfast Telegraph

Weight loss diet: Doing THIS Before Bed Could help you Lose the Love Handles

Casein is the main protein present in milk and milk products and is available to buy in powder form, similar to whey protein.

While many fitness fanatics take casein like protein powder to enhance their performance and to look leaner, researchers have found that incorporating it into a weight loss plan and taking it before you go to bed can help burn fat.

A study conducted in the Netherlands found that by multiplying casein intake by two and a half times, participants were able to have a higher metabolic rate while sleeping and a better overall fat balance.

The research, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, also found that after taking casein before sleep, satiety levels were 25 per cent higher across the following day.

Weight loss teas are a popular shortcut to flatter stomachs, and the latest version can help with weight loss goals – according to experts.

Read more at Express

Coffee diet: Can you slurp your way to slim?

What’s better than the aroma of fresh coffee brewing in the morning? How about the notion that the deep dark elixir of the dawn may actually be the key to losing weight. Oh yeah.

“Caffeine can boost athletic performance, both in terms of measurable exercise outcomes such as speed, power, and endurance, as well as psychological benefits in terms of making exercise seem more achievable,” said nutritionist Kristen Beck. “Coffee can suppress appetite simply by providing a boost of energy, but (the trouble with) relying on coffee as a source of energy is that it is only short-term.”

Other health experts note that coffee has also been associated with reducing the risks of conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease, not to mention type 2 diabetes. It may even blunt the danger of several kinds of cancer.

Continue Reading at The Mercury News

Meal Prepping May Actually Be Sabotaging Your Diet

Indeed, meal prepping’s popularity has exploded on social media. On Instagram alone there are 5.5 million photos tagged #mealprep and 1.1 million tagged #foodprep.

While perfectly portioned-out food for seven days does make for the perfect #foodporn snapshot, meal preppers are onto an idea that — at least in concept — is good for your diet, according to research.

More recently, a 2017 study of 40,000 adults in France found that people who meal prepped at least a few days at a time were less likely to be overweight and stuck more closely to nutritional guidelines.

Portion control is one key way food prepping helps people maintain a healthy weight or lose a few pounds.

A review of several studies around the role of portion control in weight management showed that eating the appropriate amount of food is directly linked.

Continue Reading at HealthLine

Successful Weight Loss Dieting? Check Blood Sugar and Insulin First!

Success on a weight-loss diet can be predicted by measuring a person’s blood sugar and fasting insulin levels, according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association meeting in San Diego.

The international study examined data from six studies of different diets designed to improve nutrition. It found that those biomarkers consistently predicted losing weight and keeping it off.

A fiber-rich diet without calorie restrictions is successful for many with prediabetes, the study found. Carbohydrate and fat intake should be adjusted according to fasting insulin levels.

“Remarkably, for many patients, use of these biomarkers can lead to a six- to seven-fold greater weight loss,” said study leader Arne Astrup. He is head of the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

The study also included researchers from the University of Colorado, Tufts University, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBER OBN) and Gelesis, Inc.

And for the diets to really stick, they can’t be temporary, but part of a changed lifestyle that people can embrace without feeling deprived.

The San Diego Union Tribe

The Worst Diet Tips a Nutritionist has Ever Hard

Want to lose weight or overhaul your eating habits for good? Chances are your Dr. Google search leaves you with more questions than answers.

Don’t make losing weight harder than it needs to be. Here are the top four terrible diet tips that could be messing with your slim-down strategy.

CALORIES VS CALORIES OUT

A calorie is still a calorie, right? So, if you had a choice between a chocolate brownie or a handful of nuts, which one would you choose? Both have roughly 170 calories, but the problem is, not all calories are created equal.

Choosing a food based on how many calories (or kilojoules) it has, doesn’t take into consideration how nutritious or filling it is.

Read the full article at Nzherald.co.nz

Are you on a diet? You can still enjoy Sandwich week!

National Sandwich week runs from 14th to 20th May 2017 and according to the organizers, British consumers manage to munch their way through over 11.5 billion sandwiches each year. If you laid each one end to end, they would go around the world about 44 times.

But with around 200 calories in 2 slices of white bread, and ready-made sandwiches often high in salt, they might be a treat for our taste buds, but not so great for our waistlines.

Here are 5 sandwich swaps for some of the most popular diets: Vegan, Dopamine, Paleo, Gluten-free and Raw.

Vegan Sandwich
A Vegan diet means no animal products at all, including butter, eggs, and dairy. To supplement your Vitamin B12 intake, Marmite is a great choice, top with bananas, which are full of Vitamin B6 that helps with brain development and function.

Dopamine Diet Sandwich
The Dopamine Diet, popularized by celebrity chef Tom Kerridge, focuses on stress-busting ingredients to put a smile on your face.

Paleo diet
The Paleo, or ‘Caveman’ diet, consists of a high protein, low carb mix, mimicking the natural diet our ancestors had. If you can’t hunt or gather it, you can’t eat it. That means no pasta, cereal or bread.

Gluten free
Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye – going gluten free is recommended for treatment of coeliac disease. There are now many gluten-free pieces of bread on the market, but for a more interesting alternative, try using grilled Portabello mushrooms as your slices. Fill with melted cheese and chicken for a hunger-busting lunch.

Raw food
The raw food diet is based on the principle that heating food destroys the essential nutrients and enzymes that aid digestion. Anything processed can’t be eaten, so bread is most definitely out.

Huffington Post

The Diet we’re all Googling but it’s not a Fad

Research shows that interest in veganism spiked in December 2016 and January 2017, with searches increasing by 28% over this period.

Gluten-free, dairy-free and sugar-free diets are about as trendy as Gucci loafers and 90s fashion right now (that’s to say, very) but the one diet we’re all Googling, according to Hitwise’s Clean Living report, is the vegan diet, which might not be a surprise if you too swear by soy-based snacks.

Veganism also extends beyond a person’s day on a plate – to the clothes they wear, for example – and subscribing to certain philosophies “that reject the commodity status of animals,” in every industry… not just food or fashion.

Interestingly, searches for “paleo” have dropped 22% since 2014, which “could be due to the negative press surrounding paleo guru, Pete Evans and his position on vaccinations,” according to the report.

Interest in going – or just reading about, anyway – “dairy free” has decreased 8% since 2015 (milk has gotten some better PR since then, apparently) but according to Hitwise, “it’s not statistically drastic enough to warrant writing this ‘diet’ off” quite yet.”

Thesatellite

Study: Diet soft drinks linked to strokes, Dementia

“So, the bottom line is, ‘Have more water and have less diet soda.’ And don’t switch to real soda.”

Americans trying to stay healthy have abandoned sugary drinks for diet drinks in droves over the past few decades on the theory the latter is better than the former. Now, more evidence has emerged to refute that rationale.

Indeed, a new study shows an association between diet soft drinks and both stroke and dementia, with people drinking diet soda daily being almost three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia as those who consumed it weekly or less.

The study kept track of 2,888 individuals age 45 and over for the development of a stroke and 1,484 participants age 60 and older for dementia over a 10-year period. All are participants in the famous Framingham Heart Study, several thousand men, and women who have had blood tests done periodically since the 1970s.

The study “found that those who reported consuming at least one artificially sweetened drink a day, compared to less than one a week, were 2.96 times as likely to have an ischemic stroke, caused by blood vessel blockage, and 2.89 times as likely to be diagnosed with dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease,” said a summary from the AHA.

A parallel study of sugary drinks did not find an association with stroke or dementia.
The artificial sweeteners consumed by those in the study included saccharin, acesulfame-K, and aspartame. Others — including sucralose, neotame, and stevia — have been approved by the FDA since the study said.

“Low-calorie sweeteners have been proven safe by worldwide government safety authorities as well as hundreds of scientific studies and there is nothing in this research that counters this well-established fact,” it said in a statement, adding: “While we respect the mission of these organizations to help prevent conditions like stroke and dementia, the authors of this study acknowledge that their conclusions do not — and cannot — prove cause and effect.”

NWF Daily News

4 Reasons you’re NOT Losing Weight on a Vegan diet

Interestingly this is not merely a notion; an Oxford University study of 40,000 adults found that those who ate a diet high in meat, had the highest Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) with vegans the lowest and vegetarians in the middle.

However, in reality, my clinical practice experience does not coincide with these research findings and in fact, those who have cut out all foods originating from animal products did not lose weight and worse still often gained weight!

Let’s take a look at some of the ways that might be sabotaging your good intentions and weight loss efforts.

1. You’re not eating enough protein
Protein is the one food group that is should be the focus of a new vegan diet with getting adequate protein the main aim. Adequate protein is also an essential as part of a weight loss program.

2. You’re eating too much
Switching to a plant-based diet inevitably focuses your choices on healthy whole grains such as brown rice, wholemeal pasta, and whole grain bread as well as vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds and the ubiquitous avocado.

3. You’re not sticking to three meals a day
By switching to a vegan diet, you find yourself focusing on your food choices more than ever; after all, you need to ensure a well-balanced diet despite eliminating a number of food groups.

4. You’re treating yourself inadvertently
Great, but more often than not, these are little more than junk food disguised under the healthy vegan banner. Take vegetable chips for example; these are very high in oil and salt and any nutrients that vegetables started out with have long been eliminated during the cooking and processing trail.

Coconut milk, delicious, creamy and sweet is laden with calories and highly processed, so less nutritive. Vegan ready meals will contain ‘filler’ ingredients such as refined flour providing little nutrient value.

Avoid processed foods in the specialty aisles and instead go back to real food, in other words, if you need a snack, choose fruits and nuts or high percent cocoa solids chocolate or perhaps some crudites and a hummus or avocado dip.

Daily Mail