What Are The Hidden Dangers Of A Yo-Yo Diet?

Yo-yo diets have gained prominence as a way to help people achieve their desired body weight, but in reality, this dangerous tactic can prove to be disastrous to your long-term health. Nonetheless, many everyday individuals continue to embark on yo-yo diets because they misunderstand the consequences of their actions and have been misled by certain professionals (like actors) who find such diets necessary for their work and success.

Yo-yo Dieting isn’t Natural

Yo-yo dieting, or rapidly losing and then gaining weight, simply isn’t natural for most human beings. Yo-yo dieting derives its name from the popular yo-yo hobby, which features a yo-yo going up and down repeatedly. So, too, does a yo-yo diet feature your body weight heavily fluctuating between a heavyweight and a light one.

Yo-yo dieting is frequently called “weight cycling,” especially in the medical community where professionals have encountered individuals who rapidly cycle across various weights in an astonishingly short period of time. Research has consistently demonstrated that the negative impacts of yo-yo dieting can cost you big in the long-run; one study noted that you see an increase in disease risk when relying on yo-yo diets, for instance, largely because they diminish your body’s immune system and its ability to retaliate against foreign pathogens while damaging some important tissue at the same time.

Talk to your Medical Professionals

If you’re one of the many people who is struggling with their weight, it’s important that you receive authoritative information by talking to your medical professionals. Dressed in their scrub pants, they can inform you better. It can be easy to take things into your own hands and believe that you can manage your health on your own, but it’s a simple matter of fact that a small mistake like committing to a yo-yo diet can have negative health effects for the remainder of your life.

Read more at Counsel Heal

Which Diet Keeps your Heart Healthy?

Diet doesn’t have to be a four-letter word.

Most of the time, a diet implies weight loss and comes loaded with restrictions and perhaps even plans that aren’t very healthy. But new recommendations released recently by a team of health experts refer to diet with a different goal in mind: preventing heart disease and stroke.

“We see a lot about diets on the internet, with everyone commenting about which ones are good for you, but tell me, good for what?” said Dr. Amit Khera, one of the authors of the 2019 Guideline on the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease. “If it’s weight loss, sure, some of these diets can help you lose weight, but that does not mean they’re heart-healthy.”

Developed by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology, the new guidelines emphasize that a healthy, nutritious diet can play a tremendous role in lowering risk for heart attack and stroke. Such a diet also can help in “reducing or reversing” obesity, high cholesterol, diabetes, and high blood pressure—all considered risk factors for heart disease.

Specifically, the recommendations advise high consumption of fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, whole grains and “lean vegetable or animal protein (preferably fish).” Plant-based and Mediterranean diets, which embrace this type of pattern, are singled out in the guidelines.

The Mediterranean diet isn’t actually one specific diet but a reflection of the eating habits common in the numerous countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. It shares many characteristics with the diet known as DASH, or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, frequently prescribed to help lower blood pressure.

Both plans emphasize fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, and nuts. But the Mediterranean diet includes regular use of olive oil, low to moderate intake of fish and poultry, and rare consumption of red meat and dairy products. The DASH diet allows more protein sources from low-fat dairy and cuts of meat and poultry.

Continue Reading at Medical Express

You Sound How You Eat: Speech Evolved As Diet Changed

A surprising new study has revealed that diverse sounds produced by human speech not only evolved after Neolithic times but also stem from biological alterations in the human bite as a result of eating softer diets.

The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has not changed since Homo sapiens emerged about 300,000 years ago. Linguistic diversity was also commonly thought to evolve independently of biological changes.

In 1985, linguist Charles Hockett suggested that labiodentals – the class of speech sounds including ‘f’ and ‘v’ in English – might have evolved as diets became softer with the move away from hunting and gathering towards agriculture and industrialized food processing.

These changes, he said, altered the human bite so that new sounds were easier to produce.

Damian Blasi and Steven Moran, researchers from the Department of Comparative Linguistics at the University of Zurich in Switzerland, thought the proposal was intriguing.

Their investigations revealed that labiodental sounds arose recently and that they did indeed stem from changes in diet and bite just as Hockett hypothesized.

“Soft diets led to the preservation of overbite and overjet, which characterizes the majority of the bites that people have nowadays,” Blasi explains. These rendered labiodental sounds low cost, or “easy” to produce.

“Since our upper teeth protrude from our mouth, they can touch the lower lips with very little effort,” he says.

“Before, heavy wear diets produced an edge-to-edge bite so the upper teeth didn’t protrude, and hence it was harder to produce those sounds. Try it yourself – put your upper and lower teeth in contact then try to produce an ‘f’.”

The team’s research suggests that the sounds originated not long before the Bronze Age in Europe and Asia. They suspect they emerged from bilabials, another class of speech sounds which include, for instance, ‘b’.

The authors explore how labiodentals might be “useful” sounds for communicating.

Read more at Cosmos Magazine

How Diet Became The Latest Front in the Culture Wars

The latest study warning us to eat less meat has brought angry skeptics out in droves. But who should we believe?

Food, how to cook it, what it does to you and what growing or rearing it does to the planet are issues that crowd the media. And yet, as the clamor grows, clarity recedes. An estimated 820 million people went hungry last year, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation. A third of all people were vitamin-deficient. Two billion were classified as overweight and 600 million as obese.

It’s also estimated that 1bn tonnes of food is wasted every year – a third of the total produced. A plethora of academic reports concerning food consumption and production have been published in recent years. The latest and arguably the most far-reaching is Food in the Anthropocene: the Eat-Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems, which was conducted over three years by 37 senior scientists from around the world and published earlier this year.

To combat the world’s growing demand for food – there will be 10 billion people to feed by 2050 – we need to cut meat almost entirely out of our diet, say the authors of the report. The argument they put forward is that eating more plant-based foods will lower the incidences of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, enable more environmentally helpful use of land and reduce carbon emissions.

The report provides a “planetary health diet” based on eating vegetables, grains, pulses and nuts, which limits red meat to one serving a week and other animal protein to greatly reduced amounts, as little as an ounce a day of fish or chicken. This, say the authors, is what we should all be eating if we’re concerned about our health and that of the planet.

In fact, the report was wholly financed by the Wellcome Trust, which is also a participant in Eat, which supplied staff, but they were paid for by Wellcome Trust.

Another criticism Blythman raised was the prospect of “cranky diets and nutritional deficiencies in affluent countries and acute protein shortages in the poorer ones”. She’s not alone, with many bloggers weighing in to question Eat-Lancet’s findings. One critic was Zoë Harcombe, who has a Ph.D. in public health nutrition and has previously questioned dietary fat guidelines. Harcombe said that the Eat-Lancet diet was “nutritionally deficient” in vitamins B12, D, sodium, potassium, and iron.

More of this story at The Guardian

Boosting Your Levels Of Exercise May Also Improve Your Diet

A new US study suggests that individuals who want to make healthier diet choices may find that starting an exercise regime could help, as results indicated that regular exercise is linked to better eating habits.

The findings, published in the International Journal of Obesity, showed that despite being told not to make any diet changes, after several weeks of exercise participants naturally started to opt for healthier food, such as lean meats, fruits, and vegetables. Their preferences for fried foods, sodas and other unhealthy options also decreased.

“The process of becoming physically active can influence dietary behavior,“ said corresponding author Molly Bray. “One of the reasons that we need to promote exercise is for the healthy habits it can create in other areas. That combination is very powerful.”

“Many people in the study didn’t know they had this active, healthy person inside them,“ Bray said. “Some of them thought their size was inevitable. For many of these young people, they are choosing what to eat and when to exercise for the first time in their lives.”

Bray also added that she believes that the findings are probably applicable to other age groups who started an exercise regime.

The Sun Daily

Plant-Focused Diet Won’t Save The Planet

Richard Vernon says population reduction would do more for the planet than a change of diet, Stuart Roberts and John Davies extol the benefits of British farming, Dr. Michael Antoniou calls for balanced scientific information and Paul Faupel on meeting his dietary needs with chocolate-enrobed brazil nuts.

Damian Carrington gives us a fine review of the “planetary health diet” in his article (New plant-focused diet would ‘transform’ planet’s future, say, scientists, theguardian.com, 16 January). It’s clear that this diet offers both better health than the current norm of a high-meat diet and a more environmental food production system with its emphasis on plant rather than animal production. However, I doubt the validity of some claims in the report.

Moreover, population reduction should be easier to effect that the proposed change of diet, the latter clearly being, as the report states, a daunting task. “Humanity has never aimed to change the global food system on the scale envisioned. Achieving this goal will require the rapid adoption of numerous changes and unprecedented global collaboration and commitment.” Conversely, when women have access to education and contraception, they will not choose to have more children than they can support. Population decline follows. The provision of education for girls and women, and of contraception, needs an only expansion of existing well-known programmes.

We do not yet understand the implications of a heavily plant-based diet like the report recommends on either our health or the environment. There is a very real possibility it could see us relying on imported produce, produced to lower standards than our own and with increased transport emissions.

In Britain, we have extensive grasslands, which act as carbon stores helping to mitigate climate change. The most effective and sustainable way to use this land is to graze livestock, which will turn inedible grass into high-quality, grass-fed, nutrient-rich beef, lamb and dairy, all reared in an extensive system.

Read more at The Guardian

Plant-Focused Diet Won’t Save The Planet

Richard Vernon says population reduction would do more for the planet than a change of diet, Stuart Roberts and John Davies extol the benefits of British farming, Dr. Michael Antoniou calls for balanced scientific information and Paul Faupel on meeting his dietary needs with chocolate-enrobed brazil nuts.

Damian Carrington gives us a fine review of the “planetary health diet” in his article (New plant-focused diet would ‘transform’ planet’s future, say, scientists, theguardian.com, 16 January). It’s clear that this diet offers both better health than the current norm of a high-meat diet and a more environmental food production system with its emphasis on plant rather than animal production. However, I doubt the validity of some claims in the report.

Moreover, population reduction should be easier to effect that the proposed change of diet, the latter clearly being, as the report states, a daunting task. “Humanity has never aimed to change the global food system on the scale envisioned. Achieving this goal will require the rapid adoption of numerous changes and unprecedented global collaboration and commitment.” Conversely, when women have access to education and contraception, they will not choose to have more children than they can support. Population decline follows. The provision of education for girls and women, and of contraception, needs an only expansion of existing well-known programmes.

We do not yet understand the implications of a heavily plant-based diet like the report recommends on either our health or the environment. There is a very real possibility it could see us relying on imported produce, produced to lower standards than our own and with increased transport emissions.

In Britain, we have extensive grasslands, which act as carbon stores helping to mitigate climate change. The most effective and sustainable way to use this land is to graze livestock, which will turn inedible grass into high-quality, grass-fed, nutrient-rich beef, lamb and dairy, all reared in an extensive system.

Read more at The Guardian

The 5 Pillars Of A Healthy Diet And The 5 Worst Fads

Some 80pc of resolutions fail by February and just 8pc of people are thought to achieve their New Year’s resolutions, studies have found. A common goal is losing weight. So why do so many people find this resolution so challenging?

Well, one of the reasons is setting out on an unsustainable path. If it’s not something you can continue to do, you’re setting yourself up to fail.

The following are particularly hazardous to health.

1. Juice Diets

Juice diets are incomplete diets. They provide carbohydrate in the form of sugar with very little vitamins and minerals as well as no fat or protein. Considering this blatant fact, juice diets are not a long-term solution.

2. Weight-loss pills

Weight-loss pills can be very unsafe. Every year there are people admitted to hospitals after becoming very unwell after consuming weight-loss pills. In a study released in 2018, 24 products containing higenamine were analyzed. The quantity of higenamine within the supplements varied significantly.

3. Weight-loss tea

The weight of a body is made up of organs, muscle, bone, fat and of course water. In fact, over half of our body is water! Weight-loss teas can cause a person to urinate more. Yes, this results in weight-loss, but not fat-loss! Some teas contain laxatives. Yes, this makes our bowels open more regularly, but this doesn’t result in fat-loss either.

Continue Reading at Independent.ie

PAHO Offers Tips For A Healthy Diet In 2019

“What we eat and drink can affect our body’s ability to fight infections, as well as how likely we are to develop health problems later in life — including obesity, heart disease, diabetes and different types of cancer,” said PAHO in a statement.

“The exact ingredients of a healthy diet will depend on different factors, like how old and how active we are, as well as the kinds of foods that are available in the communities where we live,” it added.

But across cultures, PAHO said there are some common food tips for helping to lead healthier, longer lives.

PAHO also recommends choosing wholegrain foods, like unprocessed maize, millet, oats, wheat, and brown rice, stating that they are rich in valuable fiber and can help one feel full for longer.

Also, PAHO urges lean meats “where possible, or trim it of visible fat”, and try steaming or boiling instead of frying foods when cooking.

For snacks, the health organization recommends choosing raw vegetables, unsalted nuts, and fresh fruit rather than foods that are high in sugars, fats or salt.

PAHO said too much salt can raise blood pressure, “which is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke”.

“Most people around the world overeat salt. On average, we consume double the WHO (World Health Organization) recommended a limit of 5 grams (equivalent to a teaspoon) a day.

Read the full article at Jamaica Observer

Is There One True Diet That Guarantees Better Performance?

During the 1972 Olympics in Munich, as Frank Shorter prepared to race, he had a secret ingredient up his sleeve: flat Coca-Cola. The US athlete caffeinated his way over 42 kilometers to win gold in the marathon.

Bizarre as it may sound, decades later researchers discovered that consuming caffeine during endurance exercise could give an athlete the edge.

In a new review published in Science, Australian Institute of Sport’s head of sports nutrition Professor Louise Burke and the director of The Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Professor John Hawley, explore nutritional approaches to performance in elite athletes.

They argue there is no “single, superior ‘athletic diet’”. Rather, different tactics benefit different people, forms of exercise and phases of training.

The great diet debate

The developing knowledge about how the body uses fuel helps to explain the high-carb/low-carb debate as well as the myth of the perfect “athlete’s diet”.

“The early sports nutrition guidelines were ‘let’s all eat high carbohydrate at all times because that’s what the muscles are using as fuel’,” Burke explains.

This explains the idea of energy gels during endurance races or the thought process of anyone who ever decided to skol a soft drink or eat a Mars bar right before an event.

Continue Reading at The Sydney Morning Herald