Are you on a diet? You can still enjoy Sandwich week!

National Sandwich week runs from 14th to 20th May 2017 and according to the organizers, British consumers manage to munch their way through over 11.5 billion sandwiches each year. If you laid each one end to end, they would go around the world about 44 times.

But with around 200 calories in 2 slices of white bread, and ready-made sandwiches often high in salt, they might be a treat for our taste buds, but not so great for our waistlines.

Here are 5 sandwich swaps for some of the most popular diets: Vegan, Dopamine, Paleo, Gluten-free and Raw.

Vegan Sandwich
A Vegan diet means no animal products at all, including butter, eggs, and dairy. To supplement your Vitamin B12 intake, Marmite is a great choice, top with bananas, which are full of Vitamin B6 that helps with brain development and function.

Dopamine Diet Sandwich
The Dopamine Diet, popularized by celebrity chef Tom Kerridge, focuses on stress-busting ingredients to put a smile on your face.

Paleo diet
The Paleo, or ‘Caveman’ diet, consists of a high protein, low carb mix, mimicking the natural diet our ancestors had. If you can’t hunt or gather it, you can’t eat it. That means no pasta, cereal or bread.

Gluten free
Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye – going gluten free is recommended for treatment of coeliac disease. There are now many gluten-free pieces of bread on the market, but for a more interesting alternative, try using grilled Portabello mushrooms as your slices. Fill with melted cheese and chicken for a hunger-busting lunch.

Raw food
The raw food diet is based on the principle that heating food destroys the essential nutrients and enzymes that aid digestion. Anything processed can’t be eaten, so bread is most definitely out.

Huffington Post

The Diet we’re all Googling but it’s not a Fad

Research shows that interest in veganism spiked in December 2016 and January 2017, with searches increasing by 28% over this period.

Gluten-free, dairy-free and sugar-free diets are about as trendy as Gucci loafers and 90s fashion right now (that’s to say, very) but the one diet we’re all Googling, according to Hitwise’s Clean Living report, is the vegan diet, which might not be a surprise if you too swear by soy-based snacks.

Veganism also extends beyond a person’s day on a plate – to the clothes they wear, for example – and subscribing to certain philosophies “that reject the commodity status of animals,” in every industry… not just food or fashion.

Interestingly, searches for “paleo” have dropped 22% since 2014, which “could be due to the negative press surrounding paleo guru, Pete Evans and his position on vaccinations,” according to the report.

Interest in going – or just reading about, anyway – “dairy free” has decreased 8% since 2015 (milk has gotten some better PR since then, apparently) but according to Hitwise, “it’s not statistically drastic enough to warrant writing this ‘diet’ off” quite yet.”

Thesatellite

Study: Diet soft drinks linked to strokes, Dementia

“So, the bottom line is, ‘Have more water and have less diet soda.’ And don’t switch to real soda.”

Americans trying to stay healthy have abandoned sugary drinks for diet drinks in droves over the past few decades on the theory the latter is better than the former. Now, more evidence has emerged to refute that rationale.

Indeed, a new study shows an association between diet soft drinks and both stroke and dementia, with people drinking diet soda daily being almost three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia as those who consumed it weekly or less.

The study kept track of 2,888 individuals age 45 and over for the development of a stroke and 1,484 participants age 60 and older for dementia over a 10-year period. All are participants in the famous Framingham Heart Study, several thousand men, and women who have had blood tests done periodically since the 1970s.

The study “found that those who reported consuming at least one artificially sweetened drink a day, compared to less than one a week, were 2.96 times as likely to have an ischemic stroke, caused by blood vessel blockage, and 2.89 times as likely to be diagnosed with dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease,” said a summary from the AHA.

A parallel study of sugary drinks did not find an association with stroke or dementia.
The artificial sweeteners consumed by those in the study included saccharin, acesulfame-K, and aspartame. Others — including sucralose, neotame, and stevia — have been approved by the FDA since the study said.

“Low-calorie sweeteners have been proven safe by worldwide government safety authorities as well as hundreds of scientific studies and there is nothing in this research that counters this well-established fact,” it said in a statement, adding: “While we respect the mission of these organizations to help prevent conditions like stroke and dementia, the authors of this study acknowledge that their conclusions do not — and cannot — prove cause and effect.”

NWF Daily News

4 Reasons you’re NOT Losing Weight on a Vegan diet

Interestingly this is not merely a notion; an Oxford University study of 40,000 adults found that those who ate a diet high in meat, had the highest Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) with vegans the lowest and vegetarians in the middle.

However, in reality, my clinical practice experience does not coincide with these research findings and in fact, those who have cut out all foods originating from animal products did not lose weight and worse still often gained weight!

Let’s take a look at some of the ways that might be sabotaging your good intentions and weight loss efforts.

1. You’re not eating enough protein
Protein is the one food group that is should be the focus of a new vegan diet with getting adequate protein the main aim. Adequate protein is also an essential as part of a weight loss program.

2. You’re eating too much
Switching to a plant-based diet inevitably focuses your choices on healthy whole grains such as brown rice, wholemeal pasta, and whole grain bread as well as vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds and the ubiquitous avocado.

3. You’re not sticking to three meals a day
By switching to a vegan diet, you find yourself focusing on your food choices more than ever; after all, you need to ensure a well-balanced diet despite eliminating a number of food groups.

4. You’re treating yourself inadvertently
Great, but more often than not, these are little more than junk food disguised under the healthy vegan banner. Take vegetable chips for example; these are very high in oil and salt and any nutrients that vegetables started out with have long been eliminated during the cooking and processing trail.

Coconut milk, delicious, creamy and sweet is laden with calories and highly processed, so less nutritive. Vegan ready meals will contain ‘filler’ ingredients such as refined flour providing little nutrient value.

Avoid processed foods in the specialty aisles and instead go back to real food, in other words, if you need a snack, choose fruits and nuts or high percent cocoa solids chocolate or perhaps some crudites and a hummus or avocado dip.

Daily Mail

Why can’t I lose weight? Here’s Why!

Losing weight isn’t easy and dieters often fail multiple times before getting it right.

The reasons are multifaceted. Many assume that exercise will solve the weight-loss dilemma — it won’t — or that fat will make you fat. Wrong again.

Here are five reasons your diet may be doomed:

1. Counting calories, but not eating real food
Calories from refined carbohydrates and sugar cause you to eat more, without feeling satisfied. Calories from healthy fats, fiber rich sources, and protein, however are metabolized differently and more likely to lead to effective weight loss.

2. Starting the day with carbohydrates
Cereal, toast with jam, or a big glass of OJ are breakfast staples, but studies show that starting the day with protein, instead of sugary carbohydrates leads to reduced hunger and cravings later in the day.

3. Not getting enough sleep
Sleep is glorious, and the benefits of getting enough of it are numerous. Studies show clear associations between a lack of sleep with overeating, weight gain, and obesity. If you’re struggling with your weight loss efforts, getting at least 8 hours a sleep a night may make all the difference.

4. Eating when not hungry
We often eat because we are bored, stressed, tired, thirsty, or simply because our favorite show is on. Instead, we should view food as fuel, not entertainment.

5.Hanging with the wrong crowd
One study found that individuals that had successfully lost weight were frequently met with challenges with friends, family and co-workers who undermined weight-loss efforts. In response, they would regain the weight.

A recent study found that Americans might be less likely to attempt weight loss due to simply giving up after many attempts or increasing “fat acceptance” in the United States. A recent study found that people had a hard time sticking to a diet when eating out or simply eating with friends.

Today

Ketogenic Diet: 10 Things you Need to Know!

The ketogenic diet has been quietly developing a cult following online. Maybe you’ve heard about it, or maybe you haven’t. The main thing you need to know about “keto,” the popular nickname for the diet, is that it’s high-fat, moderate protein, and low-carb. Many people who have tried the diet say the results are unbelievable. It’s known to help with more than just weight loss, too, and has been credited to helping with diabetes, Lyme disease, epilepsy, and anxiety.

If you’re interested in trying the diet, here’s what you need to know first.

1. SAY GOODBYE TO CARBS. ‘Cause you can’t have ’em! Technically speaking, you will have carbs — about 20 grams (of net carbs) per day. The source of these carbs will be vegetables, probably. But the point of this diet is to get your body to stop running on carbs. So prepare to trade in pizza, bread, pasta, and even quinoa for salads, olive oil, avocado, and meat. BUT, before you say, “hell no, I won’t go,” know that you can have some of your favorites, like bacon, ranch dressing, and even butter.

2. FAT IS YOUR FRIEND. Fat is your new fuel. You’re going to need lots of it: roughly 90 grams per day, depending on your body and weight loss goal. Finding sources of good fat isn’t too difficult, though — just reach for some almonds, macadamia nuts, and avocado.

3. IT’S GOING TO SUCK AT FIRST. Think about it: Your body has to adjust to starchy carbs going MIA. You’ll probably experience something that people refer to as “keto flu.” Basically, when your body is going through the transition into ketosis, you’ll feel some flu-like symptoms—mostly headaches. But don’t worry, it won’t last too long.

4. BUT THERE’S BACON! Bacon will get you through. Of course, having bacon every day isn’t a healthy choice, but having it at brunch will make you feel like you’re still a human while your friends scarf down waffles, home fries, and toast.

5. YOU ABSOLUTELY CANNOT HALF-ASS THIS. If you think you can just eat keto-friendly foods and that will be all it takes, you’re in for a real surprise. The truth is, you have to weigh everything you eat so that you can calculate everything you eat and keep track of your macronutrients. You’re going to have daily goals of how much fat, protein, and carbs you should eat, and if you don’t reach them, you won’t see any results.

6. YOU’RE GOING TO BECOME OBSESSED WITH READING LABELS. As part of the diet, you’ll have to check for net carbs (total carbs minus dietary fiber) on food labels constantly. It’s not really a bad thing, but get ready to be the person who says “there’s way too many carbs in that!”

7. YOUR SOCIAL LIFE MIGHT TAKE A HIT. Going out to eat isn’t the easiest thing in the world. There are absolutely keto options on almost every menu, but you’re always going to be wondering, “what kind of oil was this cooked in?” Or “were these chicken wings breaded?” And nights out drinking with your friends? Be careful.

8. SOME PEOPLE MIGHT NOT UNDERSTAND. It’s hard to explain keto to others. If you want to fully emerge yourself in the diet, you need to a lot about it. And trying to regurgitate all of that info to someone who isn’t on keto can be difficult. People will ask you why you want to deprive yourself of carbs, but you just have to keep your mind set on your goals.

9. YOUR STOMACH WILL THANK YOU. I don’t just mean your abs — which will feel slim and less bloated. If you have stomach issues, like bloating, IBS, or just chronic food comas, you’ll feel so much better on keto. You won’t eat just to eat, you’ll eat to reach your daily intake goals. For a lot of people on keto, they say they don’t even feel hungry.

10. YOU’VE GOT A FRIEND IN … THE INTERNET. If you feel like none of your friends understand the diet, don’t worry about that. Not only can you google all of your burning keto questions, but you can find communities online of other people who are doing the diet. You can share recipes and success stories, struggles, and setbacks. You’re never alone.

Delish

Food for Thought: Why we need to question the NZ diet

Healthy eating should be easy. Eat plenty of fruit and veggies, strike the right mix of protein and carbs, cut back on the booze and sugar and she’ll be right – right?

Healthy eating is deceptively complex.

But we also know it’s an issue of some urgency for New Zealand. Our ballooning obesity rate presents a public health crisis, and much of that can be traced to diet (exercise and lifestyle too, of course – but we’ll shelve those for another day).

Consensus has formed around some of the culprits: the sweet sting of sugar, increased portion sizes, and more processed food. We’ll explore those how those trends, shaped in part by the multinational food giants, have taken root in New Zealand.

We’ll track how New Zealand’s diet has evolved. In a matter of generations, we’ve moved from meat-and-three-veg to a generous buffet of fast food, prepackaged snacks, ethnic meals, and introduced ingredients from quinoa to kale.

And we’ll look at steps individuals, families, and communities are taking to change their diets for the better.

We’re not here to lecture you on how to eat (though seriously, ease off that added sugar…). But we hope this series will encourage you to question whether the way you eat suits your lifestyle, genetics, and physiology. Call it Food for Thought.

Stuff

What other Options When Diet and Exercise Fail?

Treating obesity can often be difficult. If you’re affected by obesity, you know first-hand that addressing your weight and improving your health is not always an easy task to accomplish. The scope of weight-loss options are wide and can often be confusing and intimidating.

More than 93 million Americans are affected by the disease of obesity. Obesity carries with it various other diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea and more. Combined with obesity, these conditions may greatly impact an individual’s quality of health and life.

What are some weight loss options:

Gastric bypass and other weight-loss surgeries are major, life-changing procedures. While weight-loss surgery can help reduce your risk of weight-related health problems — such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and sleep apnea — it can also pose major risks and complications. You may need to meet certain medical guidelines to qualify for weight-loss surgery. You likely will have an extensive screening process to see if you qualify.

When is surgery an option:

In general, gastric bypass and other weight-loss surgery could be an option for you if:

· Efforts to lose weight with diet and exercise have been unsuccessful

· Your body mass index (BMI) is 40 or higher (extreme obesity)

· Your BMI is 35 to 39.9 (obesity) and you have a serious weight-related health problem, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or severe sleep apnea.

In some cases, you may qualify for certain types of weight-loss surgery if your BMI is 30 to 34 and you have serious weight-related health problems.

Two-thirds of residents in South Texas are Hispanic and health problems are typically linked to lifestyle choices. More than 50% of South Texans do not get the recommended amounts of exercise, defined as 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per week, and 76% do not eat enough fruits and vegetables. These rates are similar to the rest of the state and nation.

Kris TV

Diet or Exercise: Which Is Better for Weight Loss

You’ve heard it over and over again: Diet and exercise are the keys to a healthy weight. As it turns out, though, one is far more important than the other. If you’re looking to drop pounds, your best bet is to focus on food.

Despite the constant message to burn fat and calories away at the gym, people who only change their diets lose more weight than those who only increase physical activity, according to a report in the journal Systematic Reviews.

You might have heard that muscle weighs more than fat. That’s true, but it doesn’t mean you should claim that bigger number on the scale is all muscle. “That’s a few pounds, not 20 or 30 pounds,” says Nolan Cohn. “It’s not an excuse for the weight gain.”

Still, don’t cancel your gym membership. The Systematic Reviews study found that pairing diet with exercise was even more successful for weight loss than diet alone. Exercise doesn’t just burn calories and build muscles—it boosts endorphins too, says Nolan Cohn. “It improves feelings of positivity or accomplishment,” she says. “When you combine those forces [of diet and exercise], it reinforces losing the weight and keeping it off.” While adding exercise to a healthier diet doesn’t lead to additional weight loss in the first six months of a program, those who both diet and exercise have better long-term results over a year, found a review in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Reader’s Digest

What are Health Benefits of Whole-Grain Diet

Several studies have suggested health benefits of whole grains and high dietary fiber intake, including for glycemic control and insulin sensitivity.

There has been controversy, however, about whether whole grains and fiber are beneficial for weight regulation, partially because there hasn’t been data from controlled metabolic studies.

The new study, led by Dr. Phil Karl of the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine and Tufts University, provided food to participants for eight weeks and may help explain how whole grain consumption is beneficial for weight management.

People who ate a diet with whole grains lost close to an extra 100 calories per day due to a combination of increased resting metabolic rate and greater fecal losses. This is compared to people who ate refined grains without much fiber.

Based on previous research and current study measurements, however, they believe that the calorie loss was not due exclusively to the digestion of extra fiber intake.

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans from the United States Department of Health and Human Services and the USDA recommends that Americans replace refined grains with whole grains.

The recommended daily allowance of whole grains is a minimum of 3 ounces of whole grains for women and 4 ounces for men. This is the equivalent to consuming 1.5-2 cups of brown rice or oatmeal each day.

Sci News