Kratom: The leafy green plant that could help with opiate withdrawals

There has recently been plenty of buzz over a plant-based drug that users take for recreational and medicinal reasons and it’s not marijuana – it’s Kratom.

Kratom is a leafy green plant that grows in Southeast Asia. Users grind it into a fine powder and then mix it into liquids to drink or sometimes capsules for convenience. It has received notoriety because of its reported aid for those suffering from opiate withdrawals.

According to the American Kratom Association, the herbal supplement can also be used to treat pain and depression. It is sold in parts of the United States and parts of San Diego County, but it remains illegal in the City of San Diego.

One of the many individuals using Kratom is Barbara Rago. Before she was constrained to hospitalization, Barbara was a nurse who, herself, visited patients. She loved her job, but a life-changing diagnosis put all of that on hold.

“Four years ago, I was diagnosed with spinal arthritis-sciatica – a bunch of degenerative diseases that left me unable to walk. Pretty much I was in bed for a whole year. It was excruciating. It left me unable to work. I couldn’t function,” she said.

Read more at CBS8.

Natural Remedies To Cure Sore Throat

A sore throat, causing pain and irritation, can be quite uncomfortable, especially when you swallow. It is essentially body’s immune response to viral or bacterial infections, and is caused due to inflammation and swelling of the mucous membranes in the throat.

However, certain natural remedies can help you deal with sore throat.

Here are top 3 of them.

1. Salt water gargles can help get rid of sore throat
A time-tested treatment to get relief from sore throat is to regularly gargle with salt water.

2. Because honey is more than just sweet taste
Honey is often used, with other ingredients, to get rid of a sore throat. It is particularly effective in helping fight infection, and providing relief from pain.

3. Ginger’s antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects to the rescue
Ginger, a common Indian spice, packed with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties can help reduce pain and irritation from sore throat.

Read the full article at NewsBytes

Stress in America and Possible Botanical Solutions

It’s no secret that Americans are stressed. Recently, the American Psychology Association (APA) found Americans are stressed more than ever before.1 While the source of this stress may vary between different populations, stress in America is on the rise.

Environmental stress, no matter the source, often sparks the same chain of neurological and hormonal responses in the body. As these processes continue, lasting negative effects can manifest as various chronic diseases, such as obesity and coronary heart disease (CHD) and psychological disturbances, including insomnia and increased anxiety. Consequently, many individuals have started to look to various forms of lifestyle changes to help reduce daily stress and the many lasting negative results that accompany it. Notably, APA reported 53 percent of Americans are turning to exercise, with yoga and meditation seeing a 3 percent jump in participation from last year alone.

Despite the negative overtones between diet and stress management, botanical-based supplements are also seen as a common way to cope with stress. A 2015 meta-analysis suggested a wide variance of reported use (2.3 to 22 percent) among members of western societies, depending on nation and cohort characteristics.5 Nonetheless, herbal remedies are acknowledged as possible aids in maintaining healthy cognitive functions.

Valerian root (Valeriana Officinalis), a flowering plant that is native to Europe and Asia, has shown some promise throughout literature. Supplementation with valerian root has been shown to help reduce psychological markers of stress in those suffering from generalized anxiety disorder and in healthy individuals. Similar results have also been reported accompanied by decreases in physiological markers of stress, such as blood pressure. It has been suggested these results are due to valerian root’s interaction with neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) by influencing production10 and inhibiting breakdown.

Read more at Natural Products Insider

Stress in America and Possible Botanical Solutions

It’s no secret that Americans are stressed. Recently, the American Psychology Association (APA) found Americans are stressed more than ever before.1 While the source of this stress may vary between different populations, stress in America is on the rise.

Environmental stress, no matter the source, often sparks the same chain of neurological and hormonal responses in the body. As these processes continue, lasting negative effects can manifest as various chronic diseases, such as obesity and coronary heart disease (CHD) and psychological disturbances, including insomnia and increased anxiety. Consequently, many individuals have started to look to various forms of lifestyle changes to help reduce daily stress and the many lasting negative results that accompany it. Notably, APA reported 53 percent of Americans are turning to exercise, with yoga and meditation seeing a 3 percent jump in participation from last year alone.

Despite the negative overtones between diet and stress management, botanical-based supplements are also seen as a common way to cope with stress. A 2015 meta-analysis suggested a wide variance of reported use (2.3 to 22 percent) among members of western societies, depending on nation and cohort characteristics.5 Nonetheless, herbal remedies are acknowledged as possible aids in maintaining healthy cognitive functions.

Valerian root (Valeriana Officinalis), a flowering plant that is native to Europe and Asia, has shown some promise throughout literature. Supplementation with valerian root has been shown to help reduce psychological markers of stress in those suffering from generalized anxiety disorder and in healthy individuals. Similar results have also been reported accompanied by decreases in physiological markers of stress, such as blood pressure. It has been suggested these results are due to valerian root’s interaction with neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) by influencing production10 and inhibiting breakdown.

Read more at Natural Products Inside

Ohio Banning Sales of Kratom and CBD

At a time when many pain sufferers are turning to natural supplements to relieve their pain, the state of Ohio is moving to ban two of the most popular ones.

The Ohio Board of Pharmacy voted Monday to classify kratom as a Schedule I controlled substance alongside heroin, LSD and other dangerous drugs. The move came two months after the board issued an advisory warning that sales of CBD-infused products are illegal under Ohio’s new medical marijuana program.

The pharmacy board considers kratom – which come from the leaves of a tree that grows in southeast Asia – a “psychoactive plant” that can cause hallucinations, psychosis, seizures and death. State health officials have identified six recent deaths in Ohio in which kratom “was indicated as the primary cause of death.” You can find kratom for sale at a wide range of online retailers based across the country.

A recent report from the Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring Network raised the demonization of kratom to a new level by comparing it to heroin — and falsely claiming it was common for people to inject kratom.

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New Pacific kava standards underway for global market

Avoiding a ban such as that imposed in Germany in the early 2000s and instilling confidence in an increasing global market are two of the key reasons for the quality standards being developed for Pacific kava.

The governments of Fiji, Samoa and Vanuatu have partnered with the Pacific Horticultural and Agricultural Market Access programme, or PHAMA, to develop the these standards.

The new initiative will also include the development of manuals that explain production methods, cost-effective testing methods and a push to establish more kava nurseries.

Deputy Team Leader of the PHAMA programme Semy Siakimotu spoke to Tim Glasgow about the new standards.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript at RNZ.

Is Crash Diet Really A Solution For Perfect Body?

We are what we eat. Maybe, because of this statement, many people go through the ‘diet phase’ more than once in their life. But, how far can one go to get into the desired shape? How desperate can someone be to lower the blood pressure and diabetes levels? Well, there a few (actually many) who are very keen on shedding that extra fat.

Did you know there is something called ‘vampire diet’ which calls its followers to eat only red foods at each meal? Red meat is the main component of this diet but there is a catch, the diet prefers uncooked meat (supposedly to preserve nutrients).

And this is not the only diet which commands its followers to go raw. There is this diet named ‘The raw food diet’. This diet bars you from eating anything which is heated beyond 115°F. Well, your palate is not going to be happy with this.

“The society should value only professionals to give diet advice and not quacks, just because it worked for them at personal level,” says Dr Janaki Srinath, NEC member Indian Dietetic Association.

Read the full article at Telangana Today

How To Cure Insomnia Naturally: 5 Remedies That May Help

If you struggle with insomnia, you’re not alone. According to the Sleep Health Foundation, sleep disorders affect 33 to 45 percent of Australians, preventing them from getting the meaningful rest they need to be productive the next day.

Whether you reach for chamomile tea or seek therapy to treat underlying issues of anxiety or depression, a natural cure for insomnia is within reach.

Here are five remedies that can help you cure insomnia naturally:

1. Herbal sleep remedies
2. Find time for exercise
3. Eat the right bedtime snack
4. Perfect your nighttime routine
5. Seek cognitive therapy

According to WebMD, the branch of therapy dedicated to treating insomnia can make real inroads for patients who need to treat underlying issues — rather than just fix the negative cycles of insomnia.

“Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia [CBT-I] is a structured program that helps you identify and replace thoughts and behaviors that cause or worsen sleep problems with habits that promote sound sleep,” explain the experts at WebMD. “Unlike sleeping pills, CBT-I helps you overcome the underlying causes of your sleep problems.”

Honey Coach

Industry Welcomes GM Food Disclosure Standard Proposed Rule

The publication of a proposed rule that would provide consistency in the disclosure of information regarding bioengineered or genetically modified foods was welcomed by representatives of the food industry.

According to Sarasin, FMI’s efforts in this cause include joining with farmers, manufacturers and retailers “to provide accurate, simple and unbiased information to our customers,” with a focus on consumer education through such means as SmartLabel.

Food Ingredients News has reported, however, that the U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn’t expect to meet the July deadline to create the new rule, with U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue admitting that “we’re not as close as I’d like” to doing so. The holdup appears to be due to the White House Office of Management & Budget (OMB), which still needs to review the GMO labeling rules.

Read the complete article at progressive Grocer

New Study: High Fruit Diet Could Help Women Conceive

Researchers who looked at more than 5,500 women from Britain, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand found those who consumed the least fruit were 50 per cent more likely to be infertile.

Similarly, compared to women who never or rarely ate fast food, women who consumed fast food four or more times a week took nearly a month longer to become pregnant. Their risk of infertility also doubled from eight to 16 per cent.

Professor Claire Roberts, of the University of Adelaide, Australia, who led the study, said: “These findings show that eating a good quality diet that includes fruit and minimising fast food consumption improves fertility and reduces the time it takes to get pregnant.”

For the study pregnant women were surveyed by midwives on how long it had taken them to become pregnant, as well as their intake of fruit, and fast foods such as burgers, pizza, fried chicken and chips.

“As diet is a modifiable factor, our findings underscore the importance of considering preconception diet to support timely conception for women planning pregnancy.”

Telegraph UK