Diet Rich in Nuts Associated with Less Inflammation

A diet rich in nuts may be associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation, a finding that may help explain the health benefits of nuts, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The findings suggest people who consumed five or more servings of nuts per week had lower levels of C-reactive protein and C-reactive protein than those who never or almost never ate nuts.

Peanuts and tree nuts contain a number of healthful components including magnesium, fiber, L-arginine, antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids such as α-linolenic acid. Researchers have not yet determined which of these components, or if the combination of all of them, may offer protection against inflammation.

Interest in health also has been a key driver in the market in recent years with the growing positioning of nuts as a healthy snack. Nuts have evolved into so much more than just a bar snack; they are a great snack, indeed, but they go beyond simple trail mixes for athletes and a free snack for happy-hour goers. Nuts are suitable for year-round consumption, both as an impulse snack and as a planned snack for sharing during in-home family and social occasions.

Natural Product Insider

How Algae Went From Horse Food to Wellness Trend

As a heath-food trend, it’s easy to be confused by blue-green algae (BGA). Not only does it sound gross, but googling it produces news reports of local officials at war with the toxic pond scum it can create.

Yet, many swear by BGA’s energy-boosting properties. In health-food circles, BGA usually refers to spirulina, chlorella, or — the hippest algae — Aphanizomenon Flos-aquae (AFA). Still, some BGAs can be toxic, so nutritionists recommend proceeding with caution.

The strain that appears in E3Live was discovered in the 1970s by Victor Colman, who as legend has it, was looking for a way to feed NASA scientists. In the 1990s, it became a popular racehorse supplement after Tamera Campbell, now CEO of the E3Live company began selling it to trainers for their Kentucky Derby–bound thoroughbreds.

Now E3Live is sold in powder, capsule, or frozen form at health-food stores and on Amazon. According to Campbell, the company uses a mechanical filtration system and meets all standards set by the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

“I would say that the majority of all people notice that they have more sustained energy, they feel better overall, they feel more mentally alert, they notice that their digestion and elimination improve,” Campbell said. “They notice an improvement in their hair, skin, and fingernails. And if you work out in a gym they notice their energy is sustained longer.”

The Cut – NY Mag

Olympic Diet with Veggies

The Olympic diet varies greatly among athletes, but they usually prefer quality foods with high nutritive content. Most of the sportsmen and sportswomen are very careful with their diets. They usually eat very clean, and in small quantities.

A survey organized by the SB Nation and Eater showed that the Olympic diet includes vast proportions of kale, oatmeal, and Greek yogurt. No pizza and no pancakes during training.

Sports nutritionists say that all over the world, athletes pay attention to what they are eating. The change happened only recently, in the last two generations.

Athletes are not obsessed with calories. They make sure that their diet contains enough nutrients and quality foods.

Capital Wired

5 Natural Remedies You Should Treat with Caution

From ginkgo to valerian, echinacea to mint, there is no doubt that natural herbal remedies still remain popular to this day, surviving centuries of traditional uses over time. But despite their many virtues, they are not without dangers. Always be sure you know what you’re doing when you consume or use botanicals as an alternative medicine or remedy.

St. John’s wort – Used as a treatment for mild to moderate depression, it is perfect for thwarting big morale drops. However, if you’re on birth control, watch out

Valerian – The calming properties of valerian make it a good cure for anxiety and nervous restlessness. However, watch out for the increased risk of drowsiness.

Red yeast rice – It has been said to lower high levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol and maintain blood pressure. However, it is not recommend for you to consume red yeast rice if you are already in the midst of cholesterol-lowering treatment and medication.

Ginkgo & ginseng – Increasing your blood circulation could pose a risk of continuous bleeding without clotting when you have taken anticoagulants (including aspirin). If you are already taking supplements rich in omega-3, it is best to seek medical advice.

Echinacea – Echinacea boosts immunity, strengthens the body’s defences, prevents viruses (flu, colds) and infections (recurring cystitis). However, this disrupts immunosuppressants

Marie France Asia

The Japanese Diet Secret: A Natural Drink That Is Effective For Weight Loss

What if the solution to lose weight fast and effectively required only one simple exotic ingredient? A Japanese diet secret, black soybean tea or kuromame tea has everything needed to help you lose those flabby arms and belly weight.

1. It can reduce fat.
Black soybean, popularly known as the “Crown Prince of Beans,” contains an antioxidant called anthocyanin which is found to have a rare property – it absorbs fat from the body.

2. It suppresses hunger – As a great source of fiber, the black soybean tea works as an appetite controller by making you feel fuller with less food.

3. It helps you to reduce your sugar intake – It can help control your sweet tooth and replace your daily sugar intake. It amazingly also acts as an agent to control blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

4. It boosts metabolism – The tea is high in isoflavones composite, which helps to increase the rate of metabolism. This boosted metabolism makes your body fat work as energy.

5. It can make you look younger – It contains compounds known as polyphenols that work as anti-aging agents to help keep you looking young and fresh.

Keep reading for its benefits – Lifehack.org