Kutztown has high hopes for Cannabis Festival and its 10,000 visitors

But I researched [other cannabis festivals] and decided to do it.” [More News] The Lehigh Valley is on pace for its lowest seasonal snowfall … CBD is sold around the region in health food stores and …

But I researched [other cannabis festivals] and decided to do it.” [More News] The Lehigh Valley is on pace for its lowest seasonal snowfall … CBD is sold around the region in health food stores and …

Top 7 Health Benefits of Kratom Leaves

Besides pain relief, Kratom also comes with some euphoric effects. When you consume the herb, it induces the secretion of feel-good hormones within your body, supplying your muscles with sudden bursts …

Besides pain relief, Kratom also comes with some euphoric effects. When you consume the herb, it induces the secretion of feel-good hormones within your body, supplying your muscles with sudden bursts …

Aperitif Culture’s Bright, Botanical-Based Newcomers Are the Future of Drinking

These are the appetizers of the spirits world. The word comes from the Latin amperire, “to open up,” as in to open up your palate and prep your digestive system for a fine meal. As a category, aperitifs cast a wide net, encompassing everything from the Aperol spritz to the Negroni to a small glass of Cava to a Pastis. Typically it’s something dry and a little bit bitter, light and maybe bubbly.

“AN APPROACH TO SOCIAL DRINKING THAT LEADS TO DEEPER CONNECTIONS”

The way third-generation winemakers Helena and Woody Hambrecht tell it, this is how Europeans have been drinking forever. And it’s why they created their own unique low-ABV aperitif spirit, Haus. “Aperitif culture is a way of drinking,” Helena told me, an approach to social drinking that leads to deeper connections throughout the evening, without the accidental drunkenness. “It’s about control.” And it’s not limited to before-dinner drinks.

I was so taken with the barely-sweet, botanical blends when I tried Haus with the Hambrechts that I went and ordered a bottle for a fancy dinner party I had the following week.

“YOU CAN REALLY TELL THE DIFFERENCE IN THE INGREDIENT CHOICES.”

Before Daniel de la Nuez and Aaron Fox created their line of natural botanical spirits, Forthave, the two were nerding out over centuries-old herbal medicine recipes and collecting vintage spirits. “The thing we came across is that the further back you go to pre-1950s spirits,” (in other words, before the advent of artificial ingredients) “you can really taste the difference in the ingredient choices,” Nuez says.

Like the Hambrechts, Nuez is inspired by European aperitif culture. “It’s something that I grew up with,” he says. “In Spain you go to these lunches where you start with something light, like vermouth, to get your taste buds going.” Fox studied painting in Paris, where he fell in love with natural wines and spirits. Together, they began developing their own aperitivo recipes in their home kitchens and at the Williamsburg restaurant Fox owned then, and before they knew it, the dining world was catching up with them.

APERITIFS HAVE BECOME PART OF THE DINING EQUATION.

The Marseille is the first in Forthave’s historical line of spirits. They also have a line created around colors: Red (similar to Campari), Blue (like gin), and Brown (crafted with single-origin coffee liqueur). I had a spritzer with their Red one chilly night while waiting for my table at Gaskins, a farm-to-table Hudson Valley, NY restaurant, and noticed it indeed had the bitter orange notes of Campari, but with deeper herbal tones that somehow made the drink’s experience feel lighter. It harmonized well, as I nursed it with my tart cabbage and gochujang salad and my duck with spaetzle.

Read the full article at THRILLIST

Sonoma County cannabis oil manufacturers seek to ease vaping fears

California and national public health officials continue advising against using any vaporizing products, adding further uncertainty for legal cannabis consumers and manufacturers alike … founder …

California and national public health officials continue advising against using any vaporizing products, adding further uncertainty for legal cannabis consumers and manufacturers alike … founder …

Colorado ranks high on list for use of ‘drug of concern’

Colorado is one of the leading states in estimated usage of kratom, a federally-legal drug that can cause effects similar to opioids and that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has labeled a …

Colorado is one of the leading states in estimated usage of kratom, a federally-legal drug that can cause effects similar to opioids and that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has labeled a …

Kratom at Risk in Colorado Without Legislation, Activists Say

Kratom, a popular organic substance of Southeast Asian origin … “So I went down there and testified, and after they listened to the testimony and comments from the health department, the sheriff’s …

Kratom, a popular organic substance of Southeast Asian origin … “So I went down there and testified, and after they listened to the testimony and comments from the health department, the sheriff’s …

The Green Organic Dutchman Receives Cannabis Research Licence from Health Canada

The Green Organic Dutchman Holdings Ltd. (the “Company” or “TGOD”) (TSX:TGOD) (US:TGODF), a leading producer of premium certified organic cannabis, is pleased to announce that it has secured a …

The Green Organic Dutchman Holdings Ltd. (the “Company” or “TGOD”) (TSX:TGOD) (US:TGODF), a leading producer of premium certified organic cannabis, is pleased to announce that it has secured a …

Why we need mandatory labeling of GMO products

The conversation around genetic engineering and food is undermined by a lack of information that breeds confusion and distrust. Consumers feel misled. Scientists feel misunderstood. Public officials make flailing attempts to navigate the interests of both. Meanwhile, the companies that choose to play both sides take advantage of everyone — quietly adding genetically modified organisms (GMO) or ingredients made from them to some products and non-GMO labels to others.

Afraid of GMOs? Blame non-labeling
Genetically modified organisms are commonplace and are already present in many of the foods we eat — often, though not exclusively, in the form of genetically modified corn, soy, sugar beet, and canola oil. But as ubiquitous as they are, they’re shrouded in mystery. Across most of the United States, foods made with GMO ingredients don’t bear labels attesting to that. They don’t need to mention genetic engineering on the label or elsewhere. As a result, most of us don’t know how often we eat foods containing GMOs or their byproducts.

The consequences of this labeling asymmetry aren’t surprising: People are concerned about the safety of consuming foods that contain GMOs or their byproducts. Questions naturally arise like, “If GMOs are really safe, why do food companies keep hiding them from us?”

That questioning is exacerbated by the fact that obscurity-based questions about GMO safety are often conflated with actual concerns about GMO business practices. Issues like unsafe herbicide use and the ethics of human genetic editing are completely legitimate. But because these issues are often confused with questions about the safety of food made from genetically modified organisms, they make it easy to write off genetic engineering as altogether problematic.

It’s time to label GMOs

You might expect a company that creates GMO-based products would want the issue of labeling to disappear. We don’t. In fact, we support mandatory labeling of all GMO products.
Mandatory labeling is good for consumers because it will help them be fully informed and less confused when they consider buying GMO products. It is also better for the world, which can benefit from increased understanding and use of genetic engineering technology — technology that is already being developed to help us tackle problems like starvation, disease, and climate change.
Mandatory labeling will strip away the mystery. The confusion dominating the conversation will dissipate.

Labeling works only if it’s transparent

Vermont’s labeling law — by all accounts clear and simple in application — was a good start. It was my hope that it would be extended across the United States as part of a 2016 federal law, the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (which is part of Public Law 114-214). That federal law — effective this year — mandates disclosure of certain bioengineered foods under a final rule written by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Equally worrisome is the rule’s definition of bioengineered (BE) products — its proxy term for GMOs. It is so lax that it allows thousands of products to avoid mandatory labeling even though they are genetically engineered by any popular definition of the term. Here’s an example: If the predominant ingredient in a product is egg, meat, or poultry, that product is excluded from the GMO labeling requirement even if all the remaining ingredients are genetically engineered.

Read the full article at STAT

Havre de Grace teen to testify on legislation to allow medical cannabis to be administered in schools

[More Maryland news] Soon to be the ‘crown jewel of Frederick Road … Connor said he felt improvements in his health “within minutes” after the first time he took medical cannabis. “I was hungry for …

[More Maryland news] Soon to be the ‘crown jewel of Frederick Road … Connor said he felt improvements in his health “within minutes” after the first time he took medical cannabis. “I was hungry for …