VIDEO — Health Canada Suspends CannTrust’s Cannabis Production

The Investing News Network brings investors … CannTrust product — following the ruling from Health Canada, the Alberta Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis Commission announced it would ask CannTrust …

The Investing News Network brings investors … CannTrust product — following the ruling from Health Canada, the Alberta Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis Commission announced it would ask CannTrust …

Strong Opposition Expected Against ‘Kratom’ Ban In Point Beach

Kratom is marketed for its psychoactive and opioid-like analgesic effects, the council says. “The mayor and council are concerned by the health problems posed by the use of kratom, the potential …

Kratom is marketed for its psychoactive and opioid-like analgesic effects, the council says. “The mayor and council are concerned by the health problems posed by the use of kratom, the potential …

Area health officials wary to kratom in the region

If you or your household receives a home delivery subscription to The Keene Sentinel, you are entitled to FREE access to the premium subscription services on SentinelSource.com PLUS access to FREE …

If you or your household receives a home delivery subscription to The Keene Sentinel, you are entitled to FREE access to the premium subscription services on SentinelSource.com PLUS access to FREE …

Home Remedies For Muscle Cramps

What is a muscle cramp?

It can happen after intense exercise or in the dead of night when you’re doing nothing at all but sleeping. A muscle — say your calf — seizes up without warning, leaving you wincing in pain. You’re having a muscle cramp. It’s an uncontrolled contraction of a muscle or part of a muscle, which makes it tighten and causes pain, explains Madhuri Kale, a physical therapist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Sometimes also called Charley horses, muscle cramps usually occur in the larger skeletal muscles, such as those in the legs, and are categorized as either non-exercise or exercise-related. The good news is it’s typically temporary and can be soothed with self-care at home.

What causes muscle cramps?

Various factors can contribute to muscle cramps, including launching into an intense exercise regimen without warming up or stretching and then overusing a muscle. Exercise-related muscle cramps are more common than cramps that aren’t related to exercise, says Mark A.W. Andrews, director of physiology at the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine located on the campus of Seton Hill University in Greensburg, Pennsylvania.

Remedy: Stretch the muscle.

Fortunately, for most who experience occasional muscle cramps, the momentary pain can be soothed at home. Just don’t try to push through the cramp. “Stop using that muscle. Let it relax and stretch it out,” Kale says.

Remedy: Massage the muscle.

Another thing you can do immediately if you have a cramp is to massage the muscle gently. “Massage is going to bring increased blood flow into an area,” Andrews explains. And that’s just what’s needed to help ease your tightened muscle.

Remedy: Apply heat.

Along with massage, applying heat to a cramped muscle is another way to bring more nutrient-rich blood to the area, says Dr. David Kiefer, a clinical assistant professor of family medicine at the University of Wisconsin.

Read more at WTOP

Recent deaths reignite debate over regulating kratom

The Virginia-based non-profit promotes the substance’s health benefits and actively lobbies … “I’ve been taking kratom for nearly five years,” Turner told Fox News. “It’s not a cure but it helps …

The Virginia-based non-profit promotes the substance’s health benefits and actively lobbies … “I’ve been taking kratom for nearly five years,” Turner told Fox News. “It’s not a cure but it helps …

Canada’s Next Cannabis Tourism Destination Could be This Small Town

Legally, you can’t sell or give cannabis away to the public without a Health Canada license; you can’t serve cannabis as food; you can’t smoke or vape while on a boat, or in a lounge, or club; nor can …

Legally, you can’t sell or give cannabis away to the public without a Health Canada license; you can’t serve cannabis as food; you can’t smoke or vape while on a boat, or in a lounge, or club; nor can …

A Diet That Is Healthy For You And For The Planet

Here’s a statistic that sticks in the throat: since the advent of agriculture, only 7,000 plant species out of a known 250,000 have been used by humans as food, according to UN biodiversity experts. Today, just 12 crops and five animal species make up 75 percent of global calorie intake.

This is just one factor driving a new movement: sustainable healthy eating. It is a new aspiration in dietary circles for two reasons: unhealthy diets put more people at risk from death and disease than unsafe sex, alcohol, drug and tobacco use combined; and global food production is the biggest single driver of environmental degradation.

“Taken together, the outcome is dire,” noted a 2019 report by the EAT-Lancet Commission, an influential collective of 37 scientists from 16 countries, tasked with examining how the world should feed itself in the future. “A radical transformation of the global food system is urgently needed.”

That is why scientists and policymakers are pressing people to make the “Great Food Transformation” to diets that are both nutritious and which preserve the environment sufficiently to feed future generations.

The UN Food and Agriculture Organization defines sustainable diets as those “with low environmental impacts which contribute to food and nutrition security and to a healthy life for present and future generations . . . protective and respectful of biodiversity and ecosystems, culturally acceptable, accessible, economically fair and affordable; nutritionally adequate . . . while optimizing natural and human resources.”

The reference to affordability is key: healthy diets, with the requisite five a day of fruit and veg, can be costly, but the local and seasonal fare is cheaper. The EAT-Lancet Commission scientists spent two years devising the “planetary health diet” and dished up their findings in January.

Apportioning food groups on a daily basis, nuts and legumes far outweigh chicken or fish. A daily glass of milk covers dairy requirements. Interestingly, it is an omnivorous — rather than a vegetarian or vegan — diet.

Corinna Hawkes, director of the Centre for Food Policy at the City University of London, is a commission member. “The healthy diet was based on scientific principles, not sustainability criteria,” she says.

Continue reading at Financial Times

What Is the Snake Diet, and Is It Safe?

People seeking quick fixes to achieve weight loss might be tempted by the Snake Diet.

It promotes prolonged fasts interrupted by a solitary meal. Like most fad diets, it promises quick and drastic results.

This article tells you everything you need to know about the Snake Diet, including its safety and whether it works for weight loss.

What is the Snake Diet?

The Snake Diet promotes itself not as a restrictive diet but rather a lifestyle centered around prolonged fasting.

Founded on the belief that humans historically endured periods of famine, it argues that the human body can sustain itself on just one meal a few times a week.

It was invented by Cole Robinson, who calls himself a fasting coach but has no qualifications or background in medicine, biology, or nutrition.

The diet involves an initial fast of 48 hours — or as long as possible — supplemented with Snake Juice, an electrolyte beverage. After this period, there’s a feeding window of 1–2 hours before the next fast begins.

How to follow the Snake Diet

Though the Snake Diet may superficially resemble intermittent fasting, it’s much more extreme, even reframing a standard meal pattern — breakfast, lunch, and dinner — as a supplementary food.

Robinson sets several rules for the diet on his website but continually revises them via his YouTube channel. What results is a scattered set of guidelines.

Robinson also makes sweeping calorie recommends, claiming that a newcomer to the diet needs no more than 3,500 calories per week.

For context, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends 1,600–2,400 daily calories for women and 2,000–3,000 for men — roughly 11,200–16,800 and 14,000–21,000 calories per week, respectively.

That’s significantly more than Robinson suggests, meaning that people on the Snake Diet run the risk of severe calorie deprivation.

Once you reach your goal weight, Robinson recommends 8,500 calories per week (distributed across 5 meals) for active women and 20,000 calories per week (across 3 total eating days) for active men.

Read the full article at Healthline

Penang farmers want to cash in on ‘miracle drug’ kratom as Putrajaya mulls blanket ban

Kratom is hailed by some as a cure for opioid addiction and illness but authorities are clamping down amid reports of abuse.

Mohd Saad Che May has spent most of his life being addicted to heroin.

The Bukit Mertajam resident was incarcerated 15 times in 40 years and admitted to stealing money to fuel his addiction.

“It was a living hell. I was in constant anxiety, thinking about how to get RM 50 (US$11.99) to buy the next tube to get high,” he said.

Mr Saad claimed he tackled his addiction when he started taking kratom, known locally as ketum. Kratom is a leaf hailed by locals for its pain-relieving and mildly stimulating effects.

He would pluck kratom leaves in his village, boil them for 4 to 5 hours, and drink the dark green fluid three times a day.

“It has a bitter taste but it is a miracle drug. The idea of taking heroin made me vomit after I started drinking ketum,” said Mr Saad, who now works at a local mosque.

“I’ve tried for years to kick my drug habit and it’s a huge relief to finally be able to get the proper medication,” he claimed.

Kratom is part of the coffee family, and people in northern Malaysia have been consuming it for centuries to treat back pain, fever, cough as well as diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

However, it is regulated under Malaysia’s 1952 Poison Act, making it an offence to harvest or sell the plant. Growing the plant for personal consumption is considered a grey area.

The Malaysian government is considering amending this act, such that it would be an offence to plant kratom without permission.  These changes could greatly hurt other other parts of the world such as the United States you can easily buy kratom online from a wide range of online retailers such as the popular Phytoextractum.  Kratom in the USA is imported from regions such as Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand.

Read more at channelnewsasia.com

Could GMO Crops Help Solve The Climate Crisis?

Genetically engineered cereals may hold the key to sustainable agriculture

Genetic engineering may be anathema to many card-carrying environmentalists, who typically favor organic farming over other forms of agriculture. But to overcome the threat posed by climate change — while continuing to feed 7.7 billion mouths (and counting) — many scientists say it’s time to fully embrace the three most controversial letters in the food industry: GMO.

Their goal is to radically shrink the carbon footprint of global crop cultivation by doing away with the need for synthetic fertilizers, which account for about 5% of humanity’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Through extensive DNA manipulations, scientists are optimistic they can engineer a self-fertilizing relationship between crop species and root-dwelling microbes, obviating the need for artificial fertilizer.

Plants need nitrogen to make two important building blocks of life: amino acids, which are stitched together to form proteins, and chlorophyll, which traps the sun’s energy to power photosynthesis. For millennia, farmers met their crops’ nitrogen demands either by spreading nutrient-rich manure on their fields or by rotating their crops, alternatively planting legume crops that were plowed under the soil to help fertilize the cereal crops that followed.

The arrival of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and high-yield crop varieties during the Green Revolution of the mid-20th century largely replaced these practices, ushering in a new era of bountiful food production — but at a high environmental cost.

The Organic Path

To wean agriculture off its dependence on synthetic fertilizers, many environmentalists advocate a return to organic farming practices. “We already have the solutions that we need,” says Dana Perls, senior food and technology policy campaigner with Friends of the Earth, an environmental advocacy organization based in Berkeley, California. “The most sustainable, least risky, and healthiest way to provide food for people across the world are using organic, regenerative, and ecological agricultural systems.”

A Scientific Fixation

For some scientists, the ultimate goal is to create self-fertilizing crops that can fix nitrogen themselves — but that’s a tall order. The DNA for the task can be extracted from microbes, but it doesn’t function the same way when spliced into plants. It’s such an extreme cross-species conversion, in fact, that it’s only worked in Baker’s yeast, a single-celled fungus that, while not a bacterium, is also not a plant.

It may be easier to keep nitrogen fixation under the purview of microbes and instead genetically recreate the interaction found in legumes within the roots of cereal crops. No scientist has yet succeeded in making this dream a reality, but researchers around the world are pushing forward on several of the required steps.

Under Control

This kind of “synthetic symbiosis” would obviate the need for synthetic fertilizers, notes Philip Poole, a plant microbiologist at the University of Oxford. It would also have the added bonus of mitigating the concerns around genetically modified plants escaping fields and contaminating other crops, he adds. Since any pollen that blew into a neighboring field would not carry with it the bacteria from its roots, any resulting corn plants would be at a major competitive disadvantage, since they’d be making food for their new root bugs and getting nothing in return. As such, non-modified crops should quickly overtake any intruders.

Read the full article at Dhaka Tribune