Israel is banking on cannabis as its next big industry

The liveliest champion of what he calls Israel’s “cannabis revolution” is Yuval Landschaft, a pharmacist who heads of the Medical Cannabis Unit of the Israeli Health Ministry … A digest of essential …

The liveliest champion of what he calls Israel’s “cannabis revolution” is Yuval Landschaft, a pharmacist who heads of the Medical Cannabis Unit of the Israeli Health Ministry … A digest of essential …

Natural remedies for SAD or Seasonal Affective Disorder

Holding the most appropriate acronym, seasonal affective disorder — SAD for short — is a form of depression that starts to creep up around the beginning of the rainy or cold season and tends to stick until the weather becomes warm again.

People who suffer from this medical condition generally experience a decline in their mood, a lack of interest in daily activities and difficulty getting out of bed. Other symptoms include fatigue, irritability, anxiety, carb cravings, and weight gain.

It is important to understand a bit more about the mood disorder and what triggers it before knowing the best natural remedies for this discombobulation.

Why do people get SAD?

It is believed that SAD occurs as a response to fewer daylight hours and a lack of sunlight, affecting people most during the rainy season or between January and February for Northern hemisphere dwellers.

Studies show that the condition is more common in women than men, affecting those aged between 18 and 30.

Melatonin is the hormone that the body produces when it gets dark. Its role is to induce sleepiness for a good night rest. So, if the rainy season or winter brings more hours of darkness, it can lead to increased production of melatonin.

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter (brain chemical) that puts people in a good mood. Consi­dering reduced sunlight can cause serotonin levels to fall, it is no surprise that people feel down in the dumps during rainy and cold months.

Natural remedies

Exposure to sunlight (or simply daylight) is thought to increase the brain release of serotonin, which can boost the mood and help in feeling calm and focused.

To keep the serotonin levels up and keep the melatonin levels balanced, try to spend enough time outside during the colder months.

Aim to get around 10 to 20 minutes of midday sunlight, several times per week every day if possible. Exposure time should depend on how sensitive the skin is to sunlight. To explain, those with darker skin tones may need a bit more time outside.

Continue Reading at Manila Times

More Knowledge Changes Opinions on GM Food

Jonathon McPhetres, a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Rochester, admits he’s “personally amazed” what we can do with genes, specifically genetically modified food—such as saving papayas from extinction.

“We can make crops better, more resilient, and more profitable and easier for farmers to grow so that we can provide more crops around the world,” he says.

Yet the practice of altering foods genetically, through the introduction of a gene from a different organism, has courted controversy right from the get-go. While genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are considered safe by an overwhelming majority of scientists, including the National Academy of Sciences, the World Health Organization, and the American Medical Association, only about one-third of consumers share that view.

UNDERSTANDING AND ACCEPTANCE

In a series of studies, the team discovered that people’s existing knowledge about GM food is the greatest determining factor of their attitudes towards the food—overriding all other tested factors. In fact, existing GM knowledge was more than 19 times higher as a determinant—compared to the influence of demographic factors such as a person’s education, socioeconomic status, race, age, and gender.

In one study, using a representative US sample, participants responded on a scale of 1 (don’t care if foods have been genetically modified), 2 (willing to eat, but prefer unmodified foods), to 3 (will not eat genetically modified foods). Next, the team asked 11 general science knowledge questions—such as whether the universe began with a huge explosion; antibiotics kill viruses as well as bacteria; electrons are smaller than atoms; and how long it takes for the Earth to orbit the sun.

HOW TO OVERCOME THE SKEPTICISM?

The researchers followed up by conducting a five-week longitudinal study with 231 undergraduates in the US to test, first, if a lack of knowledge about GM foods could be overcome by teaching participants the basic science behind GM technology, and second if greater knowledge would alter attitudes. McPhetres worked with Jennifer Brisson, an associate biology professor, who vetted the students’ learning materials.

The team discovered that learning the underlying science led to more positive attitudes towards genetically modified foods, a greater willingness to eat them, and a lowered perception of GM foods as risky.

Their findings, the team argues, lend direct support for the deficit model of science attitudes, which—in broad terms—holds that the public’s skepticism towards science and technology is largely due to a lack of understanding, or absence of pertinent information.

Continue Reading at Futurity

St. Charles County pausing decision to ban Kratom, instead of looking at new regulations

Councilman John White is the sole sponsor of the bill that would have banned Kratom and other similar products, calling it a public health emergency. But that bill is on hold. After hearing from many …

Councilman John White is the sole sponsor of the bill that would have banned Kratom and other similar products, calling it a public health emergency. But that bill is on hold. After hearing from many …

Ethema Signs LOI

This is potentially incredible news for the millions who battle … We are very happy to be engaged with Ethema Health and look forward to the breakthroughs we will be achieving together.” About …

This is potentially incredible news for the millions who battle … We are very happy to be engaged with Ethema Health and look forward to the breakthroughs we will be achieving together.” About …

Have We Found a Diet That Truly Works?

“Eat less and move more.” Oh, such simple advice, but is maintaining a healthy weight really that simple? We live in an era of nutritional misinformation and opinions galore. These days, it seems that everyone feels qualified to offer expert advice on diet, exercise and weight loss. With rising obesity rates all around the world, we are constantly searching for approaches to better manage our weight and our health.

For decades, the main strategy for losing weight has been to cut back on calories; what nutritionists call an “energy-restricted diet.” Although this often works in the short term, it rarely produces long-term success. It backfires because it can lead to greater feelings of hunger after the weight is lost, more obsessive thoughts about food and eating, and a greater risk of overeating due to negative emotions and stress. These complicate the bodily mechanisms that control appetite and partly explain why most people regain the weight in the long term.

Other types of restrictive diets, such as the popular high-fat, no-carbohydrate ketogenic regimen, have some of the same problems. Like low-calorie diets, they are difficult to follow over a long period of time, which can lead to feelings of frustration and failure. The challenge for researchers has been to find a strategy that is not restrictive and that can reduce feelings of hunger and improve eating habits and overall health without causing some of these negative side effects.

The answer, it turns out, maybe a diet constructed from healthy foods that are especially satiating; that is, foods that create feelings of fullness and satisfaction. Nutrition researchers have discovered many such foods, which improve appetite control and decrease food intake, conditions necessary for sustained weight loss. A satiating diet includes foods that are high in protein (such as fish),; high in fiber (whole grains, for example) and high in fruits and vegetables. It contains healthy fats, such as the polyunsaturated fats found in avocados, and includes dairy products such as yogurt. Perhaps surprisingly, it might also include capsaicin, the substance that makes jalapenos and other peppers so hot.

In a 2017 study, 34 obese men were placed on this regimen, which was 20–25 percent protein, for 16 weeks. Another 35 obese men followed a standard diet: 10–15 percent protein, and based on Canadian national guidelines for healthy eating. The men who followed the highly satiating diet significantly reduced their weight and body fat and had greater feelings of fullness compared to men who followed the standard diet. They were also better able to stick to the highly satiating diet: only 8.6 percent quit the diet, compared to 44.1 percent of the men following the standard diet.

Read more at Scientific American

Lawmaker’s ‘lonely ship’ filling up as support for legalizing cannabis grows

For Felhofer, even legalization of medicinal cannabis may not be worth the risk. He warned of the possibility of “an increased ‘stoner’ underclass, increased pressure on social services and law …

For Felhofer, even legalization of medicinal cannabis may not be worth the risk. He warned of the possibility of “an increased ‘stoner’ underclass, increased pressure on social services and law …

This Week in Cannabis: Top Stories From Across Canada From May 17-23

“Health Canada is well aware of our seasonal realities, that we need to get planting,” said Jeannette VanderMarel of 48North Cannabis Corp. WINNIPEG, MB: Curious about cannabis? Tokyo Smoke hosts this …

“Health Canada is well aware of our seasonal realities, that we need to get planting,” said Jeannette VanderMarel of 48North Cannabis Corp. WINNIPEG, MB: Curious about cannabis? Tokyo Smoke hosts this …

Kratom Information & Resource Center Launches Campaign in Wake of “Tsunami” of Unfair, Unbalanced Coverage of Coffee-Like Herb

The media accountability petition now featured at the Kratom Information & Resource Center website is directed to: ASNE – The American Society of News Editors; Association of Health Care …

The media accountability petition now featured at the Kratom Information & Resource Center website is directed to: ASNE – The American Society of News Editors; Association of Health Care …

Aurora Cannabis to research CBD with mixed martial arts outfit UFC, Canopy names new CFO

In regulatory news, the National Cannabis Industry Association is holding a legislative … The company said it has received an outdoor cultivation license from Health Canada for a 100-acre organic …

In regulatory news, the National Cannabis Industry Association is holding a legislative … The company said it has received an outdoor cultivation license from Health Canada for a 100-acre organic …