Natural Remedies To Help People With Thyroid Disease

HOUSTON – Women are more at risk than men, with one in eight women developing thyroid problems in her lifetime, especially after pregnancy and menopause. If you notice symptoms like fatigue, weight gain, constipation or depression, seek treatment from your doctor, but you can also bring treatment into your home with how you live.

It’s only a few centimeters long, but the thyroid plays a significant role.

An estimated 27 million Americans, half undiagnosed, suffer from thyroid disease. Natural remedies are not a cure, but they can lower stress, prevent disease, and make you feel better. A healthy diet, focusing on citrus fruits, leafy greens, coconut oil, ginger, and whole grains like quinoa and buckwheat can offer antioxidants and vitamin B12. Studies show that apple cider vinegar boosts metabolism and weight loss; a significant issue with hypothyroidism.

Women’s Health Network states that your stress response can directly influence thyroid function because the stress hormone cortisol can inhibit high thyroid stimulating hormones. Getting adequate sleep, meditating, practicing breathing exercises, and taking time to relax can counter unnecessary stress.

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Natural Remedies To Cure Sore Throat

A sore throat, causing pain and irritation, can be quite uncomfortable, especially when you swallow. It is essentially body’s immune response to viral or bacterial infections, and is caused due to inflammation and swelling of the mucous membranes in the throat.

However, certain natural remedies can help you deal with sore throat.

Here are top 3 of them.

1. Salt water gargles can help get rid of sore throat
A time-tested treatment to get relief from sore throat is to regularly gargle with salt water.

2. Because honey is more than just sweet taste
Honey is often used, with other ingredients, to get rid of a sore throat. It is particularly effective in helping fight infection, and providing relief from pain.

3. Ginger’s antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects to the rescue
Ginger, a common Indian spice, packed with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties can help reduce pain and irritation from sore throat.

Read the full article at NewsBytes

Stress in America and Possible Botanical Solutions

It’s no secret that Americans are stressed. Recently, the American Psychology Association (APA) found Americans are stressed more than ever before.1 While the source of this stress may vary between different populations, stress in America is on the rise.

Environmental stress, no matter the source, often sparks the same chain of neurological and hormonal responses in the body. As these processes continue, lasting negative effects can manifest as various chronic diseases, such as obesity and coronary heart disease (CHD) and psychological disturbances, including insomnia and increased anxiety. Consequently, many individuals have started to look to various forms of lifestyle changes to help reduce daily stress and the many lasting negative results that accompany it. Notably, APA reported 53 percent of Americans are turning to exercise, with yoga and meditation seeing a 3 percent jump in participation from last year alone.

Despite the negative overtones between diet and stress management, botanical-based supplements are also seen as a common way to cope with stress. A 2015 meta-analysis suggested a wide variance of reported use (2.3 to 22 percent) among members of western societies, depending on nation and cohort characteristics.5 Nonetheless, herbal remedies are acknowledged as possible aids in maintaining healthy cognitive functions.

Valerian root (Valeriana Officinalis), a flowering plant that is native to Europe and Asia, has shown some promise throughout literature. Supplementation with valerian root has been shown to help reduce psychological markers of stress in those suffering from generalized anxiety disorder and in healthy individuals. Similar results have also been reported accompanied by decreases in physiological markers of stress, such as blood pressure. It has been suggested these results are due to valerian root’s interaction with neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) by influencing production10 and inhibiting breakdown.

Read more at Natural Products Insider

Stress in America and Possible Botanical Solutions

It’s no secret that Americans are stressed. Recently, the American Psychology Association (APA) found Americans are stressed more than ever before.1 While the source of this stress may vary between different populations, stress in America is on the rise.

Environmental stress, no matter the source, often sparks the same chain of neurological and hormonal responses in the body. As these processes continue, lasting negative effects can manifest as various chronic diseases, such as obesity and coronary heart disease (CHD) and psychological disturbances, including insomnia and increased anxiety. Consequently, many individuals have started to look to various forms of lifestyle changes to help reduce daily stress and the many lasting negative results that accompany it. Notably, APA reported 53 percent of Americans are turning to exercise, with yoga and meditation seeing a 3 percent jump in participation from last year alone.

Despite the negative overtones between diet and stress management, botanical-based supplements are also seen as a common way to cope with stress. A 2015 meta-analysis suggested a wide variance of reported use (2.3 to 22 percent) among members of western societies, depending on nation and cohort characteristics.5 Nonetheless, herbal remedies are acknowledged as possible aids in maintaining healthy cognitive functions.

Valerian root (Valeriana Officinalis), a flowering plant that is native to Europe and Asia, has shown some promise throughout literature. Supplementation with valerian root has been shown to help reduce psychological markers of stress in those suffering from generalized anxiety disorder and in healthy individuals. Similar results have also been reported accompanied by decreases in physiological markers of stress, such as blood pressure. It has been suggested these results are due to valerian root’s interaction with neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) by influencing production10 and inhibiting breakdown.

Read more at Natural Products Inside

Can Diet Prevent Breast Cancer From Spreading?

Healthy diets that include plenty of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables that can boost the body’ s natural immune system can help people in their fight against cancer.

While some foods, namely unhealthy, high-fat/high-caloric foods, are best avoided, women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer who want to prevent the spread of cancer to other areas of their bodies may want to cut some surprising foods from their diets.

A study published in the journal Nature found that reducing asparagine consumption in laboratory mice with triple-negative breast cancer could dramatically reduce the ability of cancer to travel to distant sites in the body.

Asparagine is found in foods like asparagus, whole grains, soy, seafood, eggs, poultry, beef, legumes, and more. While reducing asparagine will not affect the original breast cancer tumor, it could stop cancer from showing up elsewhere in the body.

Continue Reading at Daily News

Improve GERD Symptoms With Natural Remedies

TEMECULA – Gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, is a painful condition in which stomach acid flows up the esophagus and into the mouth. Sometimes called dyspepsia, acid reflux or heartburn, GERD can generate a fiery sensation in the chest and throat that can range from mild to severe.

GERD can affect anyone regardless of their age, gender or ethnicity. In the United States, approximately 20 percent of the population has GERD, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Five million Canadians experience heartburn or acid regurgitation at least once each week, according to the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation.

In many mild to moderate cases of reflux, individuals can rely on lifestyle changes and natural remedies to prevent symptoms.

First, avoid food triggers. Certain foods and beverages, such as greasy or spicy recipes and alcoholic beverages, can make GERD symptoms strike. Acidic foods, chocolate, onions, carbonated beverages, and caffeinated beverages also may trigger GERD.

Fasting before bedtime can help. Avoid eating food and consuming beverages two to three hours before bedtime.

Lose weight. According to the Center for Esophageal Motility Disorders at Vanderbilt University, obesity is the leading cause of GERD. Extra stomach fat puts pressure on the abdomen, pushing gastric acids into the esophagus. Losing weight can reduce this pressure.

Read more on My Valley News

Ohio Banning Sales of Kratom and CBD

At a time when many pain sufferers are turning to natural supplements to relieve their pain, the state of Ohio is moving to ban two of the most popular ones.

The Ohio Board of Pharmacy voted Monday to classify kratom as a Schedule I controlled substance alongside heroin, LSD and other dangerous drugs. The move came two months after the board issued an advisory warning that sales of CBD-infused products are illegal under Ohio’s new medical marijuana program.

The pharmacy board considers kratom – which come from the leaves of a tree that grows in southeast Asia – a “psychoactive plant” that can cause hallucinations, psychosis, seizures and death. State health officials have identified six recent deaths in Ohio in which kratom “was indicated as the primary cause of death.” You can find kratom for sale at a wide range of online retailers based across the country.

A recent report from the Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring Network raised the demonization of kratom to a new level by comparing it to heroin — and falsely claiming it was common for people to inject kratom.

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Diet Affects The Breast Microbiome In Mammals

Diet influences the composition of microbial populations in the mammary glands of nonhuman primates, researchers report October 2 in the journal Cell Reports. Specifically, a Mediterranean diet increased the abundance of probiotic bacteria previously shown to inhibit tumor growth in animals.

Diet has been extensively studied as a lifestyle factor that could influence breast cancer development. Breast cancer risk in women is increased by consumption of a high-fat Western diet full of sweets and processed foods but reduced by a healthy Mediterranean diet consisting of vegetables, fish, and olive oil. Intriguingly, a recent study in humans revealed that malignant breast tumors have a lower abundance of Lactobacillus bacteria compared to benign lesions, suggesting that microbial imbalances could contribute to breast cancer.

To address this question, Shively and Cook used macaque monkeys because the animals mimic human breast biology and have been used to study breast cancer risk. One advantage over human studies is that the food intake of the monkeys can be carefully controlled for a prolonged period of time, increasing the chance of observing the profound effects of diet.

Taken together, these results suggest that diet directly influences microbiome populations outside of the intestinal tract and could impact mammary gland health. But for now, it is not clear what impact these microbes or microbial-modified metabolites have on breast cancer risk.

Read more at Science Daily