How Many Carbohydrates Should I Eat Each Day?

Along with fats, carbs are often billed as the enemy when trying to lose weight.

But the NHS still recommends a balanced diet, even when trying to lose weight, and they stress the importance of continuing to eat carbs.

The Government’s healthy eating advice says just over a third of your diet should be made up of carbs, such as pasta, bread, rice or potatoes.

Carbohydrates are important for our health and you shouldn’t cut them out of your diet completely. They help boost energy levels, as they are the body’s main source of energy.

And they help prevent against diseases, as vegetables such as pulses and varieties of starchy food, such as potatoes, maintain good gut and bowel health.

The NHS recommends people aim for an average of 30g per day, but most only eat around 18g.

Read more at The Sun

Industry Welcomes GM Food Disclosure Standard Proposed Rule

The publication of a proposed rule that would provide consistency in the disclosure of information regarding bioengineered or genetically modified foods was welcomed by representatives of the food industry.

According to Sarasin, FMI’s efforts in this cause include joining with farmers, manufacturers and retailers “to provide accurate, simple and unbiased information to our customers,” with a focus on consumer education through such means as SmartLabel.

Food Ingredients News has reported, however, that the U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn’t expect to meet the July deadline to create the new rule, with U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue admitting that “we’re not as close as I’d like” to doing so. The holdup appears to be due to the White House Office of Management & Budget (OMB), which still needs to review the GMO labeling rules.

Read the complete article at progressive Grocer

New Study: High Fruit Diet Could Help Women Conceive

Researchers who looked at more than 5,500 women from Britain, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand found those who consumed the least fruit were 50 per cent more likely to be infertile.

Similarly, compared to women who never or rarely ate fast food, women who consumed fast food four or more times a week took nearly a month longer to become pregnant. Their risk of infertility also doubled from eight to 16 per cent.

Professor Claire Roberts, of the University of Adelaide, Australia, who led the study, said: “These findings show that eating a good quality diet that includes fruit and minimising fast food consumption improves fertility and reduces the time it takes to get pregnant.”

For the study pregnant women were surveyed by midwives on how long it had taken them to become pregnant, as well as their intake of fruit, and fast foods such as burgers, pizza, fried chicken and chips.

“As diet is a modifiable factor, our findings underscore the importance of considering preconception diet to support timely conception for women planning pregnancy.”

Telegraph UK