5 Reasons to Add Spirulina to Your Diet

Spirulina, a blue-green alga commonly found in powdered, supplement form, is one of the stars of this class—and one that you may have unknowingly consumed. Over 1,400 studies have already been conducted, with results proving that adding spirulina to your diet can drastically improve your overall health and wellness. Let’s take a look at the top five ways.

Cancer Prevention
According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, “A number of animal and test tube studies suggest that spirulina increases production of antibodies, infection-fighting proteins and other cells that improve immunity and help ward off infection and chronic illnesses such as cancer.”

Cholesterol Reduction & Prevention of Atherosclerosis
Maintaining healthy cholesterol levels is important, as people with high cholesterol are at twice the risk of developing heart disease. And with spirulina, you can lower cholesterol naturally, while also preventing atherosclerosis—the thickening and hardening of the arteries that can lead to heart attacks and strokes.

Lower Blood Pressure
In addition to lowering cholesterol levels, spirulina has also been shown to significantly improve blood pressure. The algae contain a pigment called phycocyanin and, using animal subjects, scientists have discovered that phycocyanin possesses antihypertensive effects, which means, essentially, that it helps to lower blood pressure.

Encourage Weight Loss
Though green vegetables aren’t typically known for their protein content, spirulina is actually made up of about 62 percent protein, and if you’ve ever tried to shed a few pounds, you know how important it is to add enough high-quality protein to your diet.

Eliminate Candida
At proper levels, candida is a fungus that aids in nutrient absorption and digestion. But when candida overproduces, it can become a serious concern that leads to a wide variety of negative and serious health problems. In fact, invasive candidiasis is a leading cause of mycosis-related death in the United States, and candida overgrowth has become the hallmark sign for most autoimmune diseases today.

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